ischaemic necrosis


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is·che·mic ne·cro·sis

(is-kē'mik nĕ-krō'sis)
Cell death caused by hypoxia resulting from local deprivation of blood supply, as by infarction.
Synonym(s): ischaemic necrosis.

ischaemic necrosis

Local tissue death (GANGRENE) due to an inadequate blood supply.

is·che·mic ne·cro·sis

(is-kē'mik nĕ-krō'sis)
Cell death caused by hypoxia resulting from local deprivation of blood supply.
Synonym(s): ischaemic necrosis, ischaemic necrosis.
References in periodicals archive ?
ISCHAEMIC NECROSIS DUE TO INFLAMMATORY VASCULAR OCCLUSION PLUS LEPROSY REACTION
When the clinical data are correlated with the histological changes, the three first stages, early, disseminated, and well-developed, correspond to the phase in which patients have diffuse infiltration of entire skin The fourth and fifth stages of ischaemic necrosis correspond to Lucio's phenomenon or erythema necroticans.
The fourth stage of ischaemic necrosis due to non-inflammatory vascular occlusion is characterised histologically by the presence of necrotic cutaneous lesions due to vascular occlusion by endothelial proliferation or thrombosis, and clinically it coincides with the appearance of discrete purple-coloured painful spots, which lead to ulceration of the skin without systemic symptoms.
The fifth stage of ischaemic necrosis appears as an acute reactional state that may supervene in such patients and aggravates the existing vascular damage.
Microscopy showed fallopian tube with ulceration of mucosa, large areas of hemorrhage, congested blood vessels and ischaemic necrosis suggestive of hematosalpinx with torsion.
Most vesicovaginal fistulae (VVF) are caused by ischaemic necrosis of bladder wall due to foetal head impaction during prolonged obstructed labour.
He was a known case of Buerger's disease and had history of repeated amputations due to ischaemic necrosis in lower and upper extremities.
Despite the controversy surrounding the direct role of chemo toxic agents in the pathophysiology of NE, ischaemic necrosis is believed to be the triggering factor, followed by bacterial invasion in the background of severe neutropenia.