shoulder

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shoulder

 [shōl´der]
the area around the glenohumeral joint, the large ball-and-socket joint where the humerus joins the scapula. The smooth, rounded head of the humerus rests against the socket in the scapula. The joint is covered by a tough, flexible protective capsule and is heavily reinforced by ligaments that stretch across the joint. The ends of the bones where they meet at the joint are covered with a layer of cartilage that reduces friction and absorbs shock. A thin membrane, the synovial membrane, lines the socket and lubricates the joint with synovia. Further cushioning and lubrication are provided by fluid-filled sacs called bursae. Disorders of the shoulder include bursitis and dislocation.
Coronal section through the shoulder joint.
frozen shoulder popular but misleading name for adhesive capsulitis.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

shoul·der

(shōl'dĕr),
1. The lateral portion of the scapular region, where the scapula joins with the clavicle and humerus and is covered by the rounded mass of the deltoid muscle.
2. In dentistry, the ledge formed by the junction of the gingival and axial walls in extracoronal restorative preparations.
[A.S. sculder]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

shoulder

(shōl′dər)
n.
1.
a. The joint connecting the arm with the torso.
b. The part of the human body between the neck and upper arm.
2.
a. The joint of a vertebrate animal that connects the forelimb to the trunk.
b. The part of an animal near this joint.
3. often shoulders The area of the back from one shoulder to the other.
v. shoul·dered, shoul·dering, shoul·ders
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

shoulder

A descriptive term for the gently sloped acceleration rhythm seen on a paper printout of the foetal heart monitor that either precedes or follows a typical deceleration, in contrast to the usual “acceleration” (a short increase in foetal heart rate above baseline) that occurs in response to foetal movement.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

'shoulder'

Obstetrics A descriptor for the gently-sloped acceleration rhythm seen on a paper printout of the fetal heart monitor that either precedes or follows a typical deceleration, in contrast to the usual 'acceleration'–a short-term ↑ in heart rate above baseline occurring in response to fetal movement. See Deceleration, Fetal heart monitor.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

shoul·der

(shōl'dĕr)
1. The lateral portion of the scapular region, where the scapula joins with the clavicle and humerus and is covered by the rounded mass of the deltoid muscle.
2. Shoulder joint.
3. dentistry The ledge formed by the junction of the gingival and axial walls in extracoronal restorative preparations.
[A.S. sculder]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

shoulder

(shol'der)
Enlarge picture
SHOULDER
A part of the shoulder girdle complex, comprising the region of the proximal humerus, clavicle, and scapula. See: scapula; illustration

frozen shoulder

Adhesive capsulitis of shoulder.
Medical Dictionary, © 2009 Farlex and Partners

shoul·der

(shōl'dĕr)
1. In dentistry, any step formed by junction of gingival and axial walls in extracoronal restorative preparations.
2. Lateral portion of scapular region, where scapula joins with clavicle and humerus and is covered by rounded mass of the deltoid muscle.
[A.S. sculder]
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012

Patient discussion about shoulder

Q. how can i solve my back and shoulder problems? also how can i get raid of my eye bugs?

A. krando,
many thanks i will try those tips you just give me...wish you a wonderful and safe and sound newly year...

Q. shoulder and neck strain and pain I have a terrible shoulder and neck pain and i keep cracking my neck muscles to release pressure. I get temporary relief with tylenol but after few hrs the pain and strain starts again.Any ideas?

A. A mellow exercise and streching on a regular basis is the best way to release a sore back and muscles in general, including your neck. You should try that plus applying local warm temperature (for example a warm pillow)around your neck. If that doesn't work then other anti-inflammatory drugs that you either apply as a cream or take as a pill can help you.

Q. How do I gain range of motion after shoulder surgery I'm 31 years old and had a shoulder replacment last year. I still don't know why my joint gave out and 4 Orthopedic Surgeons couldn't tell me either. I have limited Range of Motion and the Dr. seems to think that because of my "age" I was less likley to get full range back. I refuse to believe that, does anyone have any suggestions on how to gain ROM back?

A. i guess you go to physiotherapy no?
that is their job. to give you range of motion after injuries, surgeries ect. they'll give you exercises specially for your condition. when i had an accident i broke my leg hip and i needed 2 months of physiotherapy that helped very much.

More discussions about shoulder
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