irrupt

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irrupt

(ĭ-rŭpt′)
intr.v. ir·rupted, ir·rupting, ir·rupts
1. To break or burst in: The boys irrupted into the kitchen.
2. Ecology To increase rapidly in number, especially beyond the normal range: snowy owls that irrupted southward.

ir·rup′tion n.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.
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In some of the irruptions examined above 'The Flowers of the Forest' signifies an effort to manage or resolve the deferral of historical ends, by giving past events a present or future purpose, or by acknowledging and giving a name to the absurdity of that project.
We must be ready to receive every moment of discourse in its sudden irruption; in that punctuality in which it appears, and in that temporal dispersion that enables it to be repeated, known, forgotten, transformed, utterly erased, and hidden, far from all view, in the dust of books.
Chapter three, "BOUNDARY: Liquid Constructions," analyzes different ways that the spatial boundaries between buildings and other objects are transgressed through the irruption of the fantastic in postmodern fictions.
Their phenomenal irruption, dominated by darker-marked juveniles and females, now affords us a special opportunity to observe them without having to venture north to the tundra.
Something abnormal may be happening in the Arctic, though, too, as we've now had an unprecedented three consecutive irruption years.
The conditions that lead to rodent population irruptions may be infrequent, and there may be thresholds for either environmental conditions or population densities that lead to the increased numbers of infected rodents that are indicators of risk of virus transmission to humans.
When a single species wanders out of its usual home range, the phenomenon is called an "irruption." When many kinds of winter finches irrupt simultaneously, that is a "Superflight," a term coined by ornithologist Carl Bock of the University of Colorado at Boulder.
The tree seed crop, normally plentiful in the forests of Ontario and Quebec, has in some cases failed completely, causing what is known as a bird irruption.
Common in northern NY; uncommon elsewhere except in generally biennial "irruptions."
Though dramatic irruptions have been the focus of decades of study, speculation and controversy among ornithologists, much still remains to be learned.
THE CONTEXT: ISOMORPHISM, IRRUPTION OF REALITY, AND EPISTEMOLOGICAL RUPTURE