irrupt

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irrupt

(ĭ-rŭpt′)
intr.v. ir·rupted, ir·rupting, ir·rupts
1. To break or burst in: The boys irrupted into the kitchen.
2. Ecology To increase rapidly in number, especially beyond the normal range: snowy owls that irrupted southward.

ir·rup′tion n.
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References in periodicals archive ?
For Heidegger, what irrupted in ancient Greece is the thought of Being.
But I think something more radical occurred: the poverty that had always been there irrupted.
5) The crisis of global financial capital that irrupted in the
41) But in All the Rage music takes its cues from the 'sonorous matter' of the riot, the anti-social forces of embodied rage and desire that irrupted in the streets; it does not express or represent them in a musical language, sublimating those libidinal energies into an aesthetic form.
6) Describing an experience in which the pain of those members of his family who went to residential school irrupted in the midst of his attempt to speak the language of a book publicist as a student in a publishing workshop, Younging stresses the impact of this irruption as a linkage to or continuity with his "ancestors' legacy," a continuity that brings responsibility.
The astonishment was even greater, though, when a young monk, nicknamed Kev the Rev, irrupted on a religious instruction class to tell us that the pope's Humanae Vitae pronouncement was a load of bunkum.
54) Jacob Talmon was among the first to describe this mystical unity of all as One as the key psychological impulse underlying this entirely new type of "totalitarian democracy" that irrupted during the French Revolution and the Terror, (55) and historical scholarship since the 1980s increasingly supports this analysis.
Commission on Human Rights, it was pointed out that, in the mid-nineties, the challenge presented by this new phenomenon should be examined in the context of the reality of the post-cold war world, as a result of the multiple internal conflicts, of ethnic and religious character, repressed in the past but irrupted in recent years precisely with the end of the cold war (51).
It was Voegelin's contention that into the vacuum of earthly meaning created by the Christian dedivinization of the world and its denial that human nature could find fulfillment through material desires irrupted various forms of Gnosticism, a somewhat deformed version of Christianity that seeks immanent salvation through human action in a redivinized world in which humanity is the locus of the divine.
A bitter feud irrupted yesterday between troubled health club operator Esporta and venture capitalist Duke Street Capital (DSC), with the latter accusing the other of lacking in creditability.
So the act of creating his own technique, creating his own vocabulary, creating his own form, leads him to overturn ideas which had hitherto remained eminently static: the fluid and instantaneous irrupted into music; and not merely the impression of the instantaneous, the fugitive, to which some have reduced it; but a genuinely irreversible, relative conception of musical time, and of the musical universe more generally.