irrupt


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irrupt

(ĭ-rŭpt′)
intr.v. ir·rupted, ir·rupting, ir·rupts
1. To break or burst in: The boys irrupted into the kitchen.
2. Ecology To increase rapidly in number, especially beyond the normal range: snowy owls that irrupted southward.

ir·rup′tion n.
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References in periodicals archive ?
The fact that (1) native phytophagous herbivores periodically irrupt and reduce the abundance and vigor of dominant plant species, (2) that these outbreaks may occur more readily in dense or lush concentrations of their hosts, and (3) that an outbreak may occur more than once during the life span of a long-lived host suggests that outbreaks may be important in community regulation and deserve serious attention from experimentalists and theorists alike.
Sargeson's earlier no-nonsense rationalist certainty is displaced by a moment of insight, where the world writes back in response to language and makes the loquat in his hand the moment it is correctly represented: in this vision language has irrupted into the world, converting the world into a 'book' that may be read.
When governments later responded to those past military rebellions with pardons and called on Argentines to forget, social memory of the past continued to irrupt in public life, impelled by the advocacy of human rights organizations and changes in the judiciary that opened new prosecutions.
While the Russian theorist Mikhail Bakhtin regarded the carnival as a social venue in which "low" democratic impulses could and did irrupt into social prominence, he also saw in it an ambivalent because short-lived and ultimately unthreatening response to prevailing political agents and institutions.
Kane dramatised, by making a war irrupt into a hotel in Leeds where an unequal, exploitative gender relation was taking place, the idea that private, gender violence is intimately connected with public and larger scale violence such as that of war and war terrorism.
Perhaps characters like the old man and M'Cola have more of a presence in this book than does Wesley in To Have and Have Not, but when the old man's voice does irrupt into Green Hills, it is only to scream "B'wana!
In freeing himself from temporal and spatial specificity, the narrator creates a site into which an alien experience can irrupt that will suspend the conventions and relations with which his readers are familiar.
"It is generally accepted that food supply is at least part of the cause of irruptions," says University of Colorado scientist Carl Bock, though, he added, there is "great disagreement," about their frequency and about whether different species irrupt in synchrony.
When vole numbers drop, every three to five years, the great gray and northern hawk owls irrupt, leaving the boreal forests and appearing in greater numbers far to the south.
It has been argued that one such tradition, that of the popular family saga, a genre with which Cousins has many features in common, 'steers a course between using history and the family as a means of exposing the interrelated dynamics of gender, class and power, and attempting a recuperation of the distances caused by this exposure through an appeal to precisely those same concepts of history and family.' (11) Texts that irrupt into present time disturb the process of narrative containment whereby setting action in the past locates it in a cyclical and closed process.
The analysis illuminates a topic that has been attracting attention in recent contributions to Aboriginal ethnography: how Dreamings irrupt into contemporary histories and act in ways that have political significance, contesting whitefella paradigms and re-asserting the world-view of the original Australians.
However, whereas for Lacan, symbolic structure underpins any act of signification, in which both registers inevitably come into play, Kristeva speaks of the semiotic as that which "precedes" the symbolic and can occasionally irrupt into it (Kristeva Reader 113) and thus as a register that can exist irrespective of it, like the primal Voice in Cixous' theorization)--an idea which is impossible in Lacanian terms, where any imaginary captation is underlain and made possible by the structures of the symbolic that legislate the combinations of signifiers.