irreversible hydrocolloid


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Related to irreversible hydrocolloid: alginate

ir·re·vers·i·ble hy·dro·col·loid

a hydrocolloid the physical state of which is changed by an irreversible chemical reaction when water is added to a powder and an insoluble substance is formed.

irreversible hydrocolloid

A hydrosol of alginic acid whose physical state is changed by an irreversible chemical reaction, forming insoluble calcium alginate. This substance is called alginate or dental alginate. Alginate is used in dentistry as a primary impression material. Synonym: alginate

CAUTION!

Care should be taken not to inhale the dust created by alginate.
See also: hydrocolloid

ir·re·vers·i·ble hy·dro·col·loid

(irrĕ-vĕrsi-bĕl hīdrō-koloyd)
A hydrocolloid the physical state of which is changed by an irreversible chemical reaction when water is added to a powder and an insoluble substance is formed.
References in periodicals archive ?
Bidi, A microbiologic investigation following the disinfection of irreversible hydrocolloid materials using the spray method.
Schwartz, Efficacy of various spray disinfectants on irreversible hydrocolloid impressions.
Schuster, Sodium hypochlorite disinfection of irreversible hydrocolloid impression material.
Thomas, Determination of bound and unbound water in dental alginate irreversible hydrocolloid by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy.
Hanafy, Extended-storage Irreversible Hydrocolloid Impression Materials.
Flores-Mir, Dimensional stability of irreversible hydrocolloid impression materials as a function of pouring time: A systematic review.
The effect of pouring time and storage condition on the accuracy of irreversible hydrocolloid impressions.
Due to their low cost and easy handling, irreversible hydrocolloids are one of the most commonly used impression materials in dental practice.
Irreversible hydrocolloids are hydrophilic materials that can reproduce hard and soft tissue detail in the presence of moisture.
In this study, compressive strength values increased as storage time increased, even in a moist environment, for all irreversible hydrocolloids tested.
Imbibition (the absorption of fluid by a colloid, resulting in swelling), evaporation, and syneresis (the expulsion of a liquid from a gel) produce dimensional changes in the morphology of irreversible hydrocolloids.
Despite the fact that irreversible hydrocolloids are hydrophilic materials, storage in a humid environment asserted no influence on the detail reproduction and gypsum compatibility of alginate impressions, even after five days of storage.