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irreducible

 [ir″rĕ-doo´sĭ-b'l]
not susceptible to reduction, as a fracture, hernia, or chemical substance.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

ir·re·duc·i·ble

(ir'rē-dū'si-bĕl, i-rē-),
1. Not reducible; incapable of being made smaller.
2. In chemistry, incapable of being made simpler, or of being replaced, hydrogenated, or reduced in positive charge.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

ir·re·duc·i·ble

(ir'rĕ-dū'si-bĕl)
1. Not reducible; incapable of being made smaller.
2. chemistry Incapable of being made simpler, or of being replaced, hydrogenated, or reduced in positive charge.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

irreducible

Incapable of being replaced or restored to a former state, as in the case of a HERNIA or a fracture. Irreversible.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
(iv) Irreducibility of polynomials ( Hungarian Jr .
It just has this kind of computational irreducibility. We just have to watch it unfold, so to speak.
The first chapter presents the nature of uncertainty: the differences in the emphasis within and across the disciplines, the discussions about the irreducibility of risk and uncertainty, and the several ways of structuring uncertainty and a deeper investigation of three topics: disease outbreaks, illicit drug use, and response to environmental problems.
In making his argument, he does not merely assert, but actively demonstrates, that what occupies the space between "historical context" and "literary text" is not "pure nothing" but a dynamic interchange involving invisible but real powers whose workings encompass multiple levels of existence, from the irreducibility of the minute particular to the building of nations and empires.
Intellectual history after the linguistic turn: the autonomy of meaning and the irreducibility of experience.
The 22 papers, include discussions of one-particle irreducibility with initial correlations, primitive elements in the Hopf algebra of free quasi-symmetric functions, Magnus expansions and beyond, not so non-renormalizable gravity, a combinatorial and field theory path to quantum gravity, and multi-scale analysis and non-commutative field theory.
The irreducibility of the moral level of existence to its physico-biological foundation is an essential ontic feature of the world" (88).
"Searle holds that the logic of reductionism predetermines the irreducibility of psychological states to behavior, disposition, matter, or function in such a way as to have no interesting implications for the metaphysics of body and mind." (13)
A similar conclusion could not have been drawn from the Diltheyan historical conscience on the irreducibility of every epochal connection.
Departing from conventional conceptions of rituals as ethereal liminal or insulated traditional domains, it demonstrates the importance of understanding rituals as emergent within their specific historical and social settings, and highlights the irreducibility of lived reality to epistemological certainty.