irreducible

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irreducible

 [ir″rĕ-doo´sĭ-b'l]
not susceptible to reduction, as a fracture, hernia, or chemical substance.

ir·re·duc·i·ble

(ir'rē-dū'si-bĕl, i-rē-),
1. Not reducible; incapable of being made smaller.
2. In chemistry, incapable of being made simpler, or of being replaced, hydrogenated, or reduced in positive charge.

irreducible

/ir·re·duc·i·ble/ (ir″ĭ-doo´sĭ-b'l) not susceptible to reduction, as a fracture, hernia, or chemical substance.

irreducible

[ir′əd(y)o̅o̅′sibəl]
Etymology: L, in, not, reducere, to bring back
unable to be returned to the normal position or condition, as an irreducible hernia. See also incarcerate.

ir·re·duc·i·ble

(ir'rĕ-dū'si-bĕl)
1. Not reducible; incapable of being made smaller.
2. chemistry Incapable of being made simpler, or of being replaced, hydrogenated, or reduced in positive charge.

irreducible

Incapable of being replaced or restored to a former state, as in the case of a HERNIA or a fracture. Irreversible.

irreducible

not susceptible to reduction, as a fracture, hernia or chemical substance.
References in periodicals archive ?
Although the value of irreducibility is arguably at the heart of humanistic ideology, psychological humanism also has various philosophical currents flowing through it.
This step is possible because of the uniqueness up to a scalar of the eigenvectors of A deduced from irreducibility.
Departing from conventional conceptions of rituals as ethereal liminal or insulated traditional domains, it demonstrates the importance of understanding rituals as emergent within their specific historical and social settings, and highlights the irreducibility of lived reality to epistemological certainty.
A similar conclusion could not have been drawn from the Diltheyan historical conscience on the irreducibility of every epochal connection.
Searle holds that the logic of reductionism predetermines the irreducibility of psychological states to behavior, disposition, matter, or function in such a way as to have no interesting implications for the metaphysics of body and mind.
By Hilbert's Irreducibility Theorem, the number of such values for m is [much less than] [Y.
Under the rubric "Fictions d'auteur," Jean-Francois Jeandillou examines the refashioning of literary history involved in a literary hoax such as the invention of Clotilde de Surville and her work; Marie Blaise explores, through the example of Mallarme, the reliance of literary history on the fiction of the romantic author; Dominique Rabate focuses on the ways fictional narratives about the lives of consecrated authors tend to negate the pompous rhetoric of "official" literary history; Christine Baron argues that the notion of the "invisible work" (imaginary, unsuccessful, or virtual works represented in fiction) reveals the conditions of possibility of literary history and the essential irreducibility of "literature" to "history.
The acceptance of identity's irreducibility seems to lead the last contribution on writers back to the first one about Svevo, where the boles of identity are regarded as precious.
Here again, Goldschmidt identifies the irreducibility of local frameworks for understanding difference in Crown Heights.
The motivating claim of Harbecke's book is irreducibility.
The act that no-one else had written about the irreducibility of cells does not prove him to be wrong.
Her arguments coalesce around a few key ideas: the difference between race and ethnicity, the difference between "identification" and what she calls the "desire-to-be," the intersectionality and irreducibility of the identity categories under study, and the production and functions of privilege.