ironic effects

ironic effects

in psychological terms, those that may occur when attempts to suppress a thought increase its accessibility to memory so that it is more likely to be brought to mind, especially under conditions of stress or increased mental load. For example, in a racquet sport if a performer focuses attention on not overhitting the ball they will often do just that. Also known as ironic process.
References in classic literature ?
Nasmyth himself was the first to thank us both for our spirited effort on his behalf; and the incident had the ironic effect of establishing an immediate entente cordiale between Raffles and his very latest victim.
The study, by three university academics and published in Psychological Science, is titled Ironic Effects Of Dietary Supplements.
Many of his ironic effects depend upon readers' knowledge of the gap between the protagonist's perspective and the communal perspective, darkening to tragedy when authorial generalizations condemn the community's punitive enforcement of social norms as hapless protagonists fall victim to their own impulses.
You get ironic effects when you couple information that people perceive with negation," said researcher Brian Earp, from Oxford University.
You get ironic effects when you couple information that people perceive with negation," the Daily Mail quoted Brian Earp, researcher from Oxford University as saying.
What's interesting is the ironic effect of the negative image.
I do not think General Semantics needs to limit itself to trying to explain ironic effects on semantic reactions and suggest ways in which irony might be used better.
If they reveal too much of the actual argument, the ironic effect is eliminated.
In the case of Der Mann ohne Eigenschaften he highlights the multiplicity of ironic effects that are produced in the text by observations which are clearly not made from the perspective of the character in question.
In this study, ironic effects of intentional memory processes were explored.
Wood has fastened onto this parallel, and draws from it rich ironic effects.
On the whole, therefore, the conclusions drawn are also homogeneous: the authors conclude that in Modernism, the Marchen is used in a contrastive manner in order to produce certain ironic effects.