iron index

i·ron in·dex

obsolete clinical laboratory value calculated by comparing erythrocyte count with accepted norm of iron level.

iron index

An obsolete form of expressing the mean iron content of erythrocytes, obtained by dividing the iron concentration of blood by the red cell count.
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In a retrospective association study, we investigated the possible influence of TNF-[alpha] -308G>A allelic variant on total body iron overload (primary study parameter), hepatic iron index, and the need for phlebotomy to prevent iron reaccumulation (secondary parameters assessed in subgroups) in patients with hereditary hemochromatosis.
We used atomic-absorption photometry to measure iron concentration in dry liver tissue from 30 patients and assessed hepatic iron index as iron concentration of dry liver tissue ([mu]mol/g) divided by the age of the patient (years).
Common Impact Hammer Metallurgies Metal Type Lifespan Applications Manganese (M2) Baseline Index: 1.0 Primary and secondary Chrome Steel Index: 1.5-1.7 Primary and secondary Chrome Iron Index: 2.7-3.2 Secondary applications of <7 inches Chrome Steel Index: 3.0-3.5 Primary and secondary ceramic pads applications
A quantitative iron study showed 92.88 [micro]mol/g of dry weight iron (reference range, 7.16-28.64 [micro]mol/g) with an iron index of 2.4 [micro]mol/g per year (reference range, [is less than] 1.0 [micro]mol/g).
The iron index from a postmortem liver sample was 2.4 [micro]mol/g per year Iron indices greater than 1.9 are usually seen in patients with homozygous hereditary hemochromatosis.[11] Iron was present in bile duct epithelium, a sign that some have linked to hereditary hemochromatosis.[12] Marked hepatic hemosiderosis has also been described in patients with hepatic cirrhosis who do not have evidence of hereditary hemochromatosis.
The measurement of HIC and the calculation of the hepatic iron index (HII), defined as HIC/age, enables the discrimination between patients with homozygous GH and those with either the heterozygous form of the disease or secondary causes of hepatic iron deposition.
Comparison of histological and biochemical hepatic iron indexes in the diagnosis of genetic haemochromatosis.
Both the HIC and its derivative, the hepatic iron index (HII) are used to establish the diagnosis of hereditary hemochromatosis (HHC) (1, 2).
Utility of hepatic iron index in American patients with hereditary hemochromatosis: a multicenter study.
The reliability of ferritin as an iron index was tested by comparison with hepatic iron concentration.
Iron accumulates with age, and iron content is best interpreted as the hepatic iron index, i.e., hepatic iron content in micromoles per gram dry weight of liver divided by the patient's age.