iridology

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iridology

 [ir″ĭ-dol´o-je]
the study of the iris as associated with disease.

ir·i·dol·o·gy

(ir'i-dol'ŏ-jē),
A hypothetic non-evidence-based system of medicine not based on evidence, involving examination of the iris, using a chart on which certain areas of the iris are presumed diagnostically specific for particular organs, systems, and structures.
[irido- + G. logos, study]

iridology

(ĭr′ĭ-dŏl′ə-jē, ī′rĭ-)
n.
The study of the iris of the eye, especially as associated with disease.

ir′i·dol′o·gist n.

iridology

Pseudomedicine
A system of pseudodiagnosis based on the belief that each body region and/or organ is represented by one of six regions on the iris; iridologists claim to diagnose imbalances in the body by studying the shape, colour(s) and qualities of the iris. Anecdotal reports imply that diseases can be identified by changes in the iris including anaemia, cardiac conditions, trauma, liver disease, adrenal dysfunction and renal stress. Interpretation of the changes seen differs according to the iridologist: while all agree that colour changes are significant, for some, whitish discolouration is believed to indicate overstimulation, while for others, these same spots indicate an accumulation of toxins (e.g., uric acid or cholesterol); all agree that clarity of the iris indicates healthiness. Once identified, defects can (in theory) be treated using vitamins, herbs, minerals and other substances.

Formal studies by the American Medical Association and the American Optometric Association have shown iridology to be ineffective as a diagnostic tool: in a well-controlled study of diagnostic accuracy of iridology, three iridologists examined photographs (without knowing the diagnosis) from the irises of 24 patients with severe and 24 with moderate renal disease, as well as 95 individuals with no known disease; the iridologists were unable to diagnose the presence or absence of renal disease with any accuracy.

Iris zones/rings and accompanying body region/organ
Inner: Stomach.
Second: Small and large intestine.
Third: Circulation of blood and lymph.
Fourth: Internal organs and endocrine system.
Fifth: Musculoskeletal system.
Outer: Skin and organs of elimination.

ir·i·dol·o·gy

(ir'i-dol'ŏ-jē)
A system of medicine not based on evidence, involving examination of the iris, using a chart on which certain areas of the iris are presumed diagnostically specific for particular organs, systems, and structures.
[irido- + G. logos, study]

iridology

Medical diagnosis by examination of the iris of the eye and the location of ‘clefts’ in areas said to represent the various parts of the body. The procedure, which is roughly analogous to REFLEXOLOGY, is rejected by orthodox ophthalmologists as having no scientific or rational basis.

iridology

The study of the iris (colour, shape, etc.), normal and abnormal. See iridodiagnosis.
References in periodicals archive ?
European iridologists discovered that they could categorize people into distinct groups based on iris colour and structure.
For example, an iridologist may be able to tell if your kidneys a rehaving to work too hard or if your digestion is sluggish.
Since every organ and part of the body is represented in the iris in a well defined area, an iridologist can use the various marks and signs to identify weaknesses or overactivity in the body so that future problems can be avoided.
Barrett says the claims of numerous iridologists in the US have been tested, but found woefully wanting.
And what better way to do that than to get an iridologist to gaze into the windows of my soul.
Qualified iridologist Clive Rooker, from Walmley, says: 'No two irises are the same.
Today, iridology is even part of the curriculum in medical schools as far afield as Moscow, Paris and Greece and iridologists can detect a vast range of conditions just by examining the eyes.
Most of the changes in the eye seen by iridologists are only visible through the use of a powerful microscope.
Iridologists claim that by checking your eyes with a torch, magnifying glass, a special microscope and possibly a camera, they can check out your entire body.
Second are iridologists who have not been exposed or are resistant to updated practices in the field.