irascible

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irascible

(ĭ-răs′ĭ-b'l) [LL. irascibilis]
Marked by outbursts of temper or irritability; easily angered.
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Instead of mentioning the four vices of excessive anger, he mentions only irascibility (orgilotes).
Negative hyperthymic mood, marked irritability, irascibility, reduced tolerance to minor frustrations, feelings of helplessness (the departure of the children, the distance from her husband), uselessness, low self-esteem, culpability, marked anxiety, vegetative manifestations (tremor, profuse sweats).
in no way be seen as indicators of arrogance or irascibility. A further
Her "aficion [la] ciega" and her change of colors attests to her state of irascibility, so her "llena de mortal ira" represents an implicit tautology, which presages her impending suicide.
Simone was herself like a thunderstorm, and did not apologize for her irascibility. It was a beast she wouldn't tame; she fed on its energy.
If the madman theory were a useful guide to statecraft, then past world leaders with a well-deserved reputation for unpredictability, impulsiveness, irascibility, violence, and bizarre behavior should have beensuccessful at getting what they want".
Gibson notes the various contributions of Thom, especially as to local legislation, but also gives a thorough account of how his "arrogance, irascibility, HBC partisanship, and francophobia" (p.
That really is too bad because Sparrow's droll orneriness and irascibility are the main reasons why the 'Pirates' franchise became a long-running hit, in the first place.
Unable to slough guilt for having decreed the death of a blameless Jesus, Pilate turns his bristling irascibility on the Jews whose city he administers and whose customs he is colonially obliged to accommodate: "Why, he had washed / At the wrong time--or had not washed, which was it?" (ll.
Yet it also makes irascibility and inaccessibility the refuge of insecure managers.
Neither did the famous British diplomat Duff Cooper who, like Waugh, was prone to outbursts of uncontrolled rudeness and irascibility.
Wales's irascibility is understandable, given that most of the characters he encounters see him as an enemy or a prize, and he responds to their advances by isolating himself, both with his gun and his temperament.