iodism


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iodism

 [i´o-dizm]
chronic poisoning by iodine or iodides, with coryza, excessive salivation, frontal headache, emaciation, weakness, and skin eruptions.

i·o·dism

(ī'ō-dizm),
Poisoning by iodine, a condition marked by severe coryza, an acneform eruption, weakness, salivation, and foul breath; caused by the continuous administration of iodine or one of the iodides.

iodism

/io·dism/ (i´ah-dizm) chronic poisoning by iodine or iodides, with coryza, ptyalism, frontal headache, emaciation, weakness, and skin eruptions.

iodism

[ī′ədiz′əm]
Etymology: Gk, ioeides + ismos, process
a condition produced by excessive amounts of iodine in the body. It is characterized by increased lacrimation and salivation, rhinitis, weakness, and skin eruption.

io·dism

(ī'ŏ-dizm)
A condition marked by acute rhinitis, an acneform eruption, weakness, salivation, and foul breath, caused by the continuous administration of iodine or one of the iodides.

io·dism

(ī'ō-dizm)
Poisoning by iodine, a condition marked by severe coryza, an acneform eruption, weakness, salivation, and foul breath.

iodism (iodine poisoning) (ī´ə-diz´əm),

n an acute or chronic intoxication caused by the ingestion or absorption of iodides. Manifestations of acute poisoning include abdominal pain, nausea, vomiting, hypersalivation, conjunctivitis, and collapse. Chronic manifestations include hypersalivation, fever, acute rhinitis, swelling and tenderness of the salivary glands, and dermatitis and stomatitis in hypersensitive individuals. Iodism is a toxic condition that sometimes follows the use of preparations containing iodine.

iodism

chronic poisoning by iodine or iodides, manifested by coryza, ptyalism, emaciation, weakness and skin eruptions.
References in periodicals archive ?
Rarely, have I observed iodism (metallic taste in mouth, frontal sinus pressure/pain, and increased salivation).
If the dose is properly regulated there need be no fear of iodism or iodine Basedowism.
Thyroid function tests were affected in 4% of the patients and iodism was present in 3% of them.
When the data from Marine's, Klinger's and Ghent's studies (3,10) were evaluated regarding the incidence of iodism in relation to the daily amount of I ingested, a positive correlation was found between those two parameters: 0% iodism at a daily amount of 1.
From Table 2, we observe that the incidence of iodism increased progressively from 0% at 2 mg to 3% at 31-62 mg.
5%) of iodism following this level of I supplementation; also within the range of 10-20 mg used in the Russian study of FDB, without any side effects reported; (8) and five times less than the largest amount of 62 mg used in Ghent's studies with a 3% iodism reported.
Iodism is dose-related, and the symptoms are unpleasant brassy taste, increased salivation, coryza, sneezing, and headache originating in the frontal sinuses.