iodine


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Related to iodine: Iodine solution, Iodine tincture

iodine

 (I) [i´o-dīn]
a chemical element, atomic number 53, atomic weight 126.904. (See Appendix 6.) Iodine is essential in nutrition, being especially prevalent in the colloid of the thyroid gland. It is used in the treatment of hypothyroidism and as a topical antiseptic. Iodine is a frequent cause of poisoning (see iodism). Deficiency of iodine causes goiter. Since iodine salts are opaque to x-rays, they can be combined with other compounds and used as contrast media in diagnostic x-ray examinations of the gallbladder and kidneys.
iodine 123 a radioactive isotope of iodine having a half-life of 13.2 hours and emitting gamma rays and x-rays. It is used in diagnostic imaging and as radiation sources in radiation therapy. Symbol 123I.
iodine 125 a radioisotope of iodine having a half-life of 60.14 days and emitting gamma rays; used as a label in radioimmunoassays and other in vitro tests, and also for thyroid imaging. Symbol 125I.
iodine 131 a radioactive isotope of iodine having a half-life of 8.04 days and emitting beta particles and gamma rays. It is used as a tracer in diagnostic imaging and as a radiation source in radiation therapy. Symbol 131I.
protein-bound iodine a test of thyroid function; see also protein-bound iodine test.
radioactive iodine radioiodine.
iodine solution a transparent, reddish brown liquid, each 100 ml of which contains 1.8 to 2.2 g of iodine and 2.1 to 2.6 g of sodium iodide; a local antiinfective agent.
strong iodine solution Lugol's solution.

i·o·dine (I),

(ī'ō-dīn, -dēn),
A nonmetallic chemical element, atomic no. 53, atomic wt. 126.90447; used in the manufacture of iodine compounds and as a catalyst, reagent, tracer, constituent of radiographic contrast media, topical antiseptic, antidote for alkaloidal poisons, and in certain stains and solutions; formerly used for prophylaxis of iodine deficiency.
[G. iōdēs, violet-like, fr. ion, a violet, + eidos, form]

iodine

(ī′ə-dīn′, -dĭn, -dēn′)
n.
1. Symbol I A lustrous, purple-black, corrosive, poisonous halogen occurring as a diatomic molecule, I2, that easily sublimes to give a purple gas and is a trace element essential for proper thyroid function. Radioactive isotopes, especially I-131, are used as medical tracers and in thyroid disease diagnosis and therapy. Iodine compounds are used as germicides, antiseptics, and dyes. Atomic number 53; atomic weight 126.9045; melting point 113.7°C; boiling point 184.4°C; density of gas 11.27 grams per liter; specific gravity (solid, at 20°C) 4.93; valence 1, 3, 5, 7. See Periodic Table.
2. An antiseptic preparation containing iodine in solution, used to treat wounds.

iodum

Homeopathy
A homeopathic remedy used for those with thyroid dysfunction, nonfocused hyperactivity and forgetfulness; it is also used for cardiovascular disease, coughs and laryngitis.

io·dine

(I) (ī'ŏ-dīn, ī'ŏ-dēn)
A nonmetallic chemical element, atomic no. 53, atomic wt. 126.90447; used as a catalyst, reagent, tracer, constituent of radiographic contrast media, therapy in thyroid disease, antidote for alkaloidal poisons, and component of some stains and solutions.
[G. iōdēs, violet-like, fr. ion, a violet, + eidos, form]

iodine

A halogen element which, in small quantities, is an essential component of the diet. Iodine is poisonous in excess and is sometimes used in an alcoholic or aqueous potassium iodide solution as an antiseptic. The radioactive isotope, iodine 131, is extensively used for thyroid imaging and thyroid function tests. The drug is on the WHO official list.

antiseptic 

An agent that kills or prevents the growth of bacteria. This term is generally restricted to agents that are sufficiently non-toxic for superficial application to living tissues. These include the preservatives for eye drops and contact lens solutions. Examples of antiseptics are alcohol, benzalkonium chloride, cetrimide, chlorbutanol, chlorhexidine, hydrogen peroxide, thimerosal (or thiomersalate). Other agents that are too toxic to be applied to living tissues are called disinfectants and are used to sterilize instruments and apparatus. See disinfection; ethylenediamine tetraacetic acid; neutralization; sterilization.

io·dine

(I) (ī'ō-dīn, ī'ŏ-dēn)
A nonmetallic chemical element, used in manufacture of iodine compounds and as a catalyst, reagent, or tracer among other purposes.
[G. iōdēs, violet-like, fr. ion, a violet, + eidos, form]
References in periodicals archive ?
Iodine is critical for the production of thyroid hormones such as T3 and T4.
Consumers are also advised to look for the Saktong Iodine sa Asin Seal to ensure that members of the household consume adequate iodine.
To compare the prevalence of iodized salt usage and consumption of iodine rich foods in patients with papillary carcinoma, follicular neoplasm and nodular colloid goitre.
Routine iodine supplementation during pregnancy is recommended by many authorities worldwide, even in iodine-sufficient areas (3).
He said that four weeks prior he took 15 milligrams of Lugol's iodine per day for 10-12 days.
Previous research studies have focused on identifying the presence of an iodine deficiency in Tanzania and the impact of initiatives that can be taken to improve overall iodine levels.
The distribution of EGA 20 pregnant women's median urinary iodine concentration within a defined age group under a defined standard categorization of median urinary iodine concentration is shown in Figure 3.
Dr Irshad Danish stressed the need for creating awareness among masses on deficiency of iodine and the way to make up this shortage.
Therefore, the aim of this study is to determine iodine concentration in household salt, the coverage of adequately iodized salt, and usefulness of salt as a carrier of iodine in Khorasan-Razavi, Iran, and to offer solutions necessary to resolve the probable problems in this regard.
Ashfaque Qureshi informed that in Pakistan a survey was conducted in 2014 /15, which showed that 60 percent children between the age group of 6 to 15 years and 70 percent women between the age group of 15 to 45 years have been affected due to non- usage of iodine salt.
Iodine is an essential element in the synthesis of thyroid hormones which have a very high biological activity in the body, they play many effects on carbohydrate metabolism, protein and lipid.