iodate


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i·o·date

(ī'ō-dāt),
A salt of iodic acid.
References in periodicals archive ?
[Na.sub.2][S.sub.2][O.sub.3] was standardized with potassium iodate (KI[O.sub.3]) by the AOAC #942.27 method [49].
There would be a reception/rest centre set up at Amlwch Leisure Centre where the health board would distribute potassium iodate tablets and medics and nuclear workers would monitor radioactive contamination.
Inoue et al., "Irreversible photoreceptors and RPE cells damage by intravenous sodium iodate in mice is related to macrophage accumulation," Investigative Opthalmology & Visual Science, vol.
[17] found that the [{MG/Co[([PW.sub.9]).sub.2]}.sub.n] multilayer films exhibited excellent electrocatalytic performance for nitrite and iodate reduction with very low detection limits.
Support was given to the local communities in terms of iodisation machines and potassium iodate supplies [18].
Iodized salt contains > 15 PPM of iodine (added as potassium iodate, KIO3) per 100g.
(3) Provided (per kilogram of diet): vitamin A, 12,000 IU; vitamin [D.sub.3], 2,000 IU; vitamin E, 30 IU; vitamin [K.sub.3], 2.5 mg; vitamin [B.sub.1], 2.5 mg; vitamin [B.sub.2], 4 mg; vitamin [B.sub.6], 3 mg; vitamin [B.sub.12], 20 [micro]g; niacin, 40 mg; pantothenic acid, 12.5 mg; folic acid, 0.7 mg; biotin, 0.07 mg; iron, 100 mg (as iron sulfate monohydrate); copper, 10 mg (as copper sulfate); zinc, 80 mg (as zinc sulfate); manganous, 30 mg (as manganous oxide); iodate, 0.25 mg (as calcium iodate); selenite, 0.15 mg (as sodium selenite).
Potassium iodide, but not potassium iodate, as a potential protective agent against oxidative damage to membrane lipids in porcine thyroid.
Ghadermarzi, "Amperometric detection of nitrite, iodate and periodate at glassy carbon electrode modified with catalase and multi-wall carbon nanotubes," Sensors and Actuators, B: Chemical, vol.
Iodination of salt, by addition of potassium iodate, is a strategy recommended by the United Nations Children's Fund(UNICEF) and the World Health Organization (WHO), as a public health measure [7].