vulnerability

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vul·ner·a·bil·i·ty

(vŭl'nĕr-ă-bil'i-tē),
Weakness of susceptibility to damage.
[L. vulnerabilis, susceptible to injury, fr. vulnero, to wound, fr. vulnus, wound]

vul·ner·a·bil·i·ty

(vŭl'nĕr-ă-bil'i-tē)
Susceptibility or weakness; often associated with a particular situation (e.g., illiness, poverty, illiteracy).
[L. vulnerabilis, susceptible to injury, fr. vulnero, to wound, fr. vulnus, wound]

vul·ner·a·bil·i·ty

(vŭl'nĕr-ă-bil'i-tē)
Weakness of susceptibility to damage.
[L. vulnerabilis, susceptible to injury, fr. vulnero, to wound, fr. vulnus, wound]
References in periodicals archive ?
Katz points to Bob Fosse's All That Jazz as a key influence on Invulnerability, which reconstructs Siegel's life as a series of splintered deathbed recollections.
Sardar Akhtar Mengal observed that no heed is being paid in the entire country toward the miseries of Baloch nation which shows that establishment treats the Balochs as their slaves and by killing their leaders in cold blood, they want to give a message of invulnerability.
The previous sense of strength and invulnerability is now gone," said the ADB-sponsored study, noting that "there were concerns about the effect of a shallow recession in the US, but the general perception was that Asia, the largest regional emerging market group, was doing well".
The invulnerability scale measures the degree to which adolescents believe they are immune from harm or injury (e.
Invulnerability: A false of invulnerability occurs when past success is associated with the incumbent CEO.
Thorburn, who enjoyed two spells as a national selector in 1992-1993 and 2000-2001, believes the All Blacks' invulnerability will make them unstoppable this autumn.
The attacks seemed to change America's sense of security, our sense of invulnerability, even our attitude toward the world.
This can translate into feelings of superiority and invulnerability.
Once a bacterium develops drug resistance, a genetic element that's common in bacteria enables the newfound invulnerability to rapidly spread to other bacteria--even beyond the original species.
The authors find a consistent retrenchment of grief into the anger phase, where the pain of losing national invulnerability is transferred to externalized aggression.
It is not uncommon for those who hold these values to convey a certain invulnerability that often translates behaviorally as lack of respect, under-appreciating multiple perspectives, objectivity polarized against emotion and intuition, failure to seek win-win solutions, or as insularity and lack of openness.