involution

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involution

 [in″vo-lu´shun]
1. a rolling or turning inward.
2. one of the movements involved in the gastrulation of many animals.
3. a retrograde change of the entire body or in a particular organ, as the retrograde changes in the female genital organs that result in normal size after delivery.
4. the progressive degeneration occurring naturally with advancing age, resulting in shriveling of organs or tissues. adj., adj involu´tional.
Involution of the uterus. Height of the uterine fundus decreases by approximately 1 cm/day. From McKinney et al., 2000.

in·vo·lu·tion

(in'vō-lū'shŭn),
1. Return of an enlarged organ to normal size.
2. Turning inward of the edges of a part.
3. In psychiatry, mental decline associated with advanced age.
Synonym(s): catagenesis
[L. in-volvo, pp. -volutus, to roll up]

involution

/in·vo·lu·tion/ (in″vo-loo´shun)
1. a rolling or turning inward.
2. a retrograde change of the body or of an organ, as the retrograde changes in size of the female genital organs after delivery.
3. the progressive degeneration occurring naturally with age, resulting in shriveling of organs or tissues.involu´tional

involution

(ĭn′və-lo͞o′shən)
n.
1.
a. The act of involving.
b. The state of being involved.
2. Intricacy; complexity.
3. Something, such as a long grammatical construction, that is intricate or complex.
4. Mathematics An operation, such as negation, which, when applied to itself, returns the original number.
5. Embryology The ingrowth and curling inward of a group of cells, as in the formation of a gastrula from a blastula.
6. Medicine
a. A decrease in size of an organ, as of the uterus following childbirth.
b. A progressive decline or degeneration of normal physiological functioning occurring as a result of the aging process.

in′vo·lu′tion·al adj.

involution

[in′vəlo̅o̅′shən]
Etymology: L, involvere, to wrap up
1 a normal process of turning or rolling inward characterized by a decrease in the size of an organ caused by a decrease in the size of its cells, such as postpartum involution of the uterus.
2 (in embryology) a developmental process in which a group of cells grows over the rim at the border of the organ or part and, rolling inward, rejoins the organ or part to form a tube, such as in the heart or bladder.

involution

Gynecology See Uterine involvement Medtalk A ↓in organ size or functional capacity, generally understood to be age-related.

in·vo·lu·tion

(in'vŏ-lū'shŭn)
1. Return of an enlarged organ to normal size.
2. Turning inward of the edges of a part.
3. psychiatry Mental decline associated with advanced age.
Synonym(s): catagenesis.
[L. in-volvo, pp. -volutus, to roll up]

involution

1. Decay, retrogression or shrinkage in size.
2. A return to a former state.
3. An infolding or INVAGINATION.

involution

(of plant organs) having rolled-up margins.

in·vo·lu·tion

(in'vŏ-lū'shŭn)
1. Return of an enlarged organ to normal size.
2. Turning inward of the edges of a part.
[L. in-volvo, pp. -volutus, to roll up]

involution

1. a rolling or turning inward.
2. one of the movements involved in the gastrulation of many animals.
3. a retrograde change of the entire body or in a particular organ, as the retrograde changes in the female genital organs that result in normal size after delivery.
4. the progressive degeneration occurring naturally with advancing age, resulting in shriveling of organs or tissues.

uterine involution
reduction in size of the uterus in the period immediately after parturition.
References in periodicals archive ?
3, since the number of 3412-avoiding involutions of length [l.
Lemma 2 Let F be a set of fixed point free involutions which is expanded and closed under deflation; let G be the set of its irreducible involutions.
k](r), let [iota] be an r-admissible involution of [Z.
Overdosing of antibiotic in cases of retention of placenta leads to delayed uterine involution and delay in post partum oestrus with chances of metritis or pyometra.
not equal to] 2, h a nondegenerate hermitian form with values in a quaternion division algebra D with standard involution J over k with residue field of char.
The former implies that one has a continuous fixed point free involution on [S.
In the implementation, we add powers of 10 random elements to L, and the results of 10 applications of the involution jumper.
One such subgroup, generated by n - 1 involutions associated with the respective ranks of P, was discovered by Grinberg and Roby (2014).
We note that a continuous involution F of D onto D is an open map.
The Chevalley-Weyl involution a induces an anti-holomorphic involution on the flag variety G/H, and [G.
n,j] denotes the number of centrosymmetric involutions on [n] with j ascents (and hence n - 1 - j descents).
Here the clawlike hardware gripping the stacked sequence of leather cylinders also acts to hold open their outer layer to bare the alarmingly raw and flesh-like involutions of the subcutaneous interior.