involution


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Related to involution: involution of uterus

involution

 [in″vo-lu´shun]
1. a rolling or turning inward.
2. one of the movements involved in the gastrulation of many animals.
3. a retrograde change of the entire body or in a particular organ, as the retrograde changes in the female genital organs that result in normal size after delivery.
4. the progressive degeneration occurring naturally with advancing age, resulting in shriveling of organs or tissues. adj., adj involu´tional.
Involution of the uterus. Height of the uterine fundus decreases by approximately 1 cm/day. From McKinney et al., 2000.

in·vo·lu·tion

(in'vō-lū'shŭn),
1. Return of an enlarged organ to normal size.
2. Turning inward of the edges of a part.
3. In psychiatry, mental decline associated with advanced age.
Synonym(s): catagenesis
[L. in-volvo, pp. -volutus, to roll up]

involution

(ĭn′və-lo͞o′shən)
n.
1.
a. The act of involving.
b. The state of being involved.
2. Intricacy; complexity.
3. Something, such as a long grammatical construction, that is intricate or complex.
4. Mathematics An operation, such as negation, which, when applied to itself, returns the original number.
5. Embryology The ingrowth and curling inward of a group of cells, as in the formation of a gastrula from a blastula.
6. Medicine
a. A decrease in size of an organ, as of the uterus following childbirth.
b. A progressive decline or degeneration of normal physiological functioning occurring as a result of the aging process.

in′vo·lu′tion·al adj.

involution

Gynecology See Uterine involvement Medtalk A ↓in organ size or functional capacity, generally understood to be age-related.

in·vo·lu·tion

(in'vŏ-lū'shŭn)
1. Return of an enlarged organ to normal size.
2. Turning inward of the edges of a part.
3. psychiatry Mental decline associated with advanced age.
Synonym(s): catagenesis.
[L. in-volvo, pp. -volutus, to roll up]

involution

1. Decay, retrogression or shrinkage in size.
2. A return to a former state.
3. An infolding or INVAGINATION.

involution

(of plant organs) having rolled-up margins.

in·vo·lu·tion

(in'vŏ-lū'shŭn)
1. Return of an enlarged organ to normal size.
2. Turning inward of the edges of a part.
[L. in-volvo, pp. -volutus, to roll up]
References in periodicals archive ?
There was no significant difference between treatments for uterine involution at 10, 18 and 30 days postpartum (Figure 4A).
Ultrasonographic studies on the reproductive tract of mares after parturrition: effect of involution and uterine fluid on pregnancy rates in mares with normal and delayed first postpartum ovulatory cycles.
Following to IP, the well-known encountered complications are dystocia, placental retention and endometritis that these gynecological problems prevent to the genital canal involution [2, 13, 25].
In this paper we shall use a spectral problem for an ordinary differential operators with involution. Such and similar spectral problems were considered in [29-40].
If [P.sub.i] = [Q.sub.i], ([P.sub.i], [T.sub.j]) is an involution with fixed data ([[member of].sub.i] [right arrow] [F.sub.1]) [??] ([[mu].sub.i] [right arrow] [F.sub.2]), and if [P.sub.i] [intersection] [Q.sub.i] = [empty set], ([P.sub.i],[T.sub.j]) and ([Q.sub.i],[T.sub.j]) are involutions with fixed data [[member of].sub.i] [right arrow] [F.sub.1] and [[mu].sub.i] [right arrow] [F.sub.2], respectively.
Our study involved use of tacrolimus topically as a 0.03% ointment as an attempt to hasten involution. We obtained excellent response in two patients (18.2%), good response in 5 patients (45.4%), moderate response in 3 patients (27.3%), while poor response in 1 patient (9.1%).
Afterwards the main contribution of this paper, the theory of neutrosophic evolution, the dynamicity of species, several examples of evolution, involution, and indeterminacy (neutrality), neutrosophic selection, refined neutrosophic theory of evolution, and the paper ends with open questions on evolution/neutrality/involution.
The size of the uterus decreases rapidly over the first 30 postpartum days (1st, 3rd, 10th, and 30th days); later, the involution decreases steadily till two months postpartum.
The thymus is also one of the most active organs, as it undergoes organogenesis (cell migration, proliferation, and differentiation), development (proliferation, differentiation, and cell apoptosis), and age-related involution (cell senescence and apoptosis) [14].
The hallmarks of IH are their 3 clearly defined stages: they appear in the first weeks of life and undergo a rapid growth phase, followed by a period of slow involution with possible residual lesions [1, 2].