involuntary sterilization


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involuntary sterilization

Any procedure that renders a legally incompetent person permanently infertile. It is performed only under court order, and only when other less drastic means of preventing unwanted procreation have failed.
See also: sterilization
References in periodicals archive ?
(47.) For an overview of involuntary sterilization in California prisons see Alex Lee, Robin Levi, and Chivy Sok, Human Rights Violations against Women of Color in the United States: A Report on U.S.
abortion or involuntary sterilization, a determination has only been
Cutchin that the involuntary sterilization of a black woman through tubal ligation after a C-section was not a battery, reasoning that it "was not harmful because it did not cause any additional physical pain, injury, or illness other than that occasioned by the C-section procedure." (344) The court completely failed to recognize the loss of reproductive functions itself as a form of physical harm, just as the BIA has failed to recognize the serious harm caused by forced IUD usage without the presence of "aggravating factors" such as pain and bleeding.
Following the amendment to the refugee definition by the IIRIRA, the BIA and several circuits have debated the scope of section 601(a) and whether it extends to individuals who had not personally endured a forced abortion or involuntary sterilization. Part III (A) of this Note discusses the administrative protocol required when circuit courts review the statutory interpretations of administrative agencies under the Chevron analysis.
Professor of political science and history, Edwin Black calls the involuntary sterilization of unsuspecting women and men--eugenicide, or the systematic annihilation of a group of hapless people through eugenical-sterilization.
The political cover for these sorry shenanigans comes from the 1984 Kemp-Kasten bill, which authorizes withholding of funds if an agency ``supports or participates'' in coercive abortion or involuntary sterilization.
Reilly, The Surgical Solution: A History of Involuntary Sterilization in the United States (Baltimore, Md.: The Johns Hopkins University Press, 1991), 33, 39-40.
Second, some of the sexuality issues faced by people living with physical disabilities (congenital and acquired) and developmental disabilities (e.g., involuntary sterilization, capacity for responsible sexual behaviour, care giver attitudes) will be discussed.
In May, the American investigators found "no evidence that UNFPA has knowingly supported or participated in the management of a program of coercive abortion or involuntary sterilization in the [People's Republic of China]" and recommended release of the $34 million appropriation.
The report of the Powell team, made available Monday, concludes, however, there is ''no evidence that UNFAP has knowingly supported or participated in the management of programs of coercive abortion or involuntary sterilization'' in China and recommends releasing the allocated money to the fund.
Supreme Court struck down an Oklahoma eugenics law that authorized involuntary sterilization for individuals convicted of three or more "felonies involving moral turpitude." (1) The Court found that because the law exempted felons convicted of white-collar crimes such as embezzlement, and because Oklahoma could point to no justification for its unequal treatment of the two classes of offenders, the law violated the Constitution's equal protection clause.
For instance, during the 1920s and _30s, dozens of states engaged in involuntary sterilization of "habitual criminals" and "feebleminded" individuals.