involuntary

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involuntary

 [in-vol´un-tar″e]
performed independently of the will.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

in·vol·un·tar·y

(in-vol'ŭn-tār'ē), Avoid the jargonistic use of this word as a synonym of incontinent ("He was involuntary twice during the night").
1. Independent of the will; not volitional.
2. Contrary to the will.
[L. in- neg. + voluntarius, willing, fr. volo, to wish]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

involuntary

(ĭn-vŏl′ən-tĕr′ē)
adj.
1. Acting or done without or against one's will: an involuntary participant in what turned out to be an argument.
2. Not subject to control of the volition: gave an involuntary start.

in·vol′un·tar′i·ly (-târ′ə-lē) adv.
in·vol′un·tar′i·ness n.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

manslaughter

Forensic medicine The unlawful, unjustifiable, and/or inexcusable, killing of one human by another, under circumstances lacking premeditation, deliberation, and express or implied malice. See Serial killer. Cf Murder.
Manslaughter  
Voluntary That which is committed voluntarily in a heat of passion
Involuntary That which occurs when a person commits an unlawful act that is not felonious or tending to cause great bodily harm, or when a person is committing a lawful act without due caution or requisite skill–eg a surgeon performing an operation while intoxicated, and inadvertently kills another
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

in·vol·un·tar·y

(in-vol'ŭn-tar-ē)
1. Independent of the will; not volitional.
2. Contrary to the will.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

in·vol·un·tar·y

(in-vol'ŭn-tar-ē)
Independent of or contrary to the will.
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
is sensible given the Court's conclusion that moral involuntariness
The consideration of alternate harms connotes a choice between interests or values that cohabits uneasily with the requirement of normative involuntariness. (87) Moreover, the defence is not confined to situations where the harm caused by the illegal act is less than the harm that would have resulted from compliance with the law.
The fundamental basis of the decision is that the Supreme Court created this new principle of fundamental justice because they were worried about the ramifications of equating moral involuntariness with moral innocence: they denied that morally involuntary behaviour is necessarily not blameworthy.
Haley presented the type of brutal scenario typical of the early involuntariness cases.
Involuntariness in Hypnotic Responding and Dissociative Symptoms.
So this is different to some extent from the other two moods of inability and involuntariness, and I suggest calling this perferitative mood, that is the mood where the subject suffers an event.
First and foremost, the UPAA places the burden of proof upon the challenger of the agreement to show involuntariness in the execution as well as unconscionability and lack of disclosure and lack of knowledge of the other's financial circumstances.
This involuntariness is a classic suggestion response.
Just as conduct can be located along a continuum from involuntary to non-voluntary to voluntary-but-coerced to fully voluntary, beliefs and emotions can also be understood in Horder's terms as falling out along a spectrum from involuntariness to full deliberative control.
433 (1974)], the Court took the teeth out of incorporation by asserting that compulsion meant nothing different from involuntariness after all.
(121) The Farben tribunal found that commercial agreements during military occupation may be found to be involuntary, but that involuntariness must be proven by more than the existence of the occupation itself; there must be proof of illegal pressure applied during the transaction, and that illegal pressure must affect the resulting transaction.