involuntary

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involuntary

 [in-vol´un-tar″e]
performed independently of the will.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

in·vol·un·tar·y

(in-vol'ŭn-tār'ē), Avoid the jargonistic use of this word as a synonym of incontinent ("He was involuntary twice during the night").
1. Independent of the will; not volitional.
2. Contrary to the will.
[L. in- neg. + voluntarius, willing, fr. volo, to wish]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

involuntary

(ĭn-vŏl′ən-tĕr′ē)
adj.
1. Acting or done without or against one's will: an involuntary participant in what turned out to be an argument.
2. Not subject to control of the volition: gave an involuntary start.

in·vol′un·tar′i·ly (-târ′ə-lē) adv.
in·vol′un·tar′i·ness n.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

manslaughter

Forensic medicine The unlawful, unjustifiable, and/or inexcusable, killing of one human by another, under circumstances lacking premeditation, deliberation, and express or implied malice. See Serial killer. Cf Murder.
Manslaughter  
Voluntary That which is committed voluntarily in a heat of passion
Involuntary That which occurs when a person commits an unlawful act that is not felonious or tending to cause great bodily harm, or when a person is committing a lawful act without due caution or requisite skill–eg a surgeon performing an operation while intoxicated, and inadvertently kills another
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

in·vol·un·tar·y

(in-vol'ŭn-tar-ē)
1. Independent of the will; not volitional.
2. Contrary to the will.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

in·vol·un·tar·y

(in-vol'ŭn-tar-ē)
Independent of or contrary to the will.
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
STUDY 2: DIFFERENCES BETWEEN VOLUNTARILY AND INVOLUNTARILY REDUNDANT RE-EMPLOYEES ON DEPRESSION, PERCEIVED JOB INSECURITY, ORGANIZATIONAL COMMITMENT, AND PERCEIVED RE-EMPLOYMENT QUALITY
(6) Accordingly, the Code of Practice for the British Mental Health Act (7) prescribes that informed consent to treatment be obtained from a patient when he or she is capable of giving it, whether or not the patient has been admitted to hospital involuntarily.
She was involuntarily admitted as a patient as a result of a judgment entered after a finding of not guilty by reason of insanity in the death of her mother.
Here, the phrases spoken are reflections on their experience of estrangement from the "loving man" of the title, the husband and father parted from his family both by personal and political changes; but the players laugh involuntarily as they flub their lines.
carriers in such areas as on-time performance and involuntarily denied boarding (e.g., when flights are overbooked), according to a report in The Washington Post.
They said remarks by the Right Rev Michael Nazir-Ali, Bishop of Rochester, were "adding to the suffering of involuntarily childless couples", who often kept their infertility a secret.
Q What rights do I have if I am involuntarily bumped from my flight?
Looking like a gargoyle in the jet-stream, Girl rapidly and involuntarily blinks.
Some werewolves change shape at will; others, in whom the condition is hereditary or acquired by having been bitten by a werewolf, change shape involuntarily under the influence of a full moon.
Readers will see: * How to structure multi-party exchanges * How to minimize the amount of taxable boot received in an exchange * How to structure statutory deferred exchanges * When you should use a qualified intermediary in a simultaneous exchange * How to deal with the [section] 1245 and [section] 1250 recapture rules in connection with exchanges and conversions of depreciable properties * What constitutes an involuntary conversion * Why deferred exchanges are particularly dangerous for partnerships * The risks and rewards of using related parties in connection with exchanges and replacements of involuntarily converted property
The number and proportion of persons involuntarily working part time--sometimes referred to as the "partially unemployed"--generally rise during a recession and decline during a recovery period.
In the past, employees are not protected from involuntarily separation.