invisible profession

'invisible' profession

 Nursing, see there.
References in periodicals archive ?
For many years, we have been subjected to unfortunate terms such as "the invisible profession." With the field of environmental health encompassing so many aspects of our lives and our environment and making headline news, it is perplexing to think that what we do may still be unknown and unrecognized by the general public.
At the inquiry there was constant reference to the invisible profession. It is necessary to link to the national teacher standards and benchmarks to identify yourself within that context.
The invisible profession. American Journal of Critical Care, 7(4), 250-252.
For years, an element within our ranks has complained that we are the invisible profession. Long ago, I tossed that metaphor aside as it positioned us as victims and invited us to adopt a victim mentality.
Second, an important message is here about how, at the end of the day, society depends on our quiet and all-too-often invisible profession and it's about time that others realized that!
The workers felt that their deeds went unrecognized, and decided that they needed to have some publicity, because they thought that they had become "the invisible profession."
It also includes working to make "the invisible profession" more visible.
First, I'd like to continue with past president Rob Blake's efforts at marketing "the invisible profession." Environmental health is not well known either by the public or the legislators (whether they're at the city, county, state, or federal level) that approve and control our budgets.
Note from Rob Blake, NEHA president: This year as president of NEHA my aim has been to make our "Invisible Profession" more visible.
Earlier that day, I'd given an update on the activities of the CDC Environmental Health Services Branch and then made my Invisible Profession presentation.
There have been a number of responses to my earlier columns on the invisible profession and the many symptoms of invisibility.