viscosity

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Related to inviscid: Incompressible flow

viscosity

 [vis-kos´ĭ-te]
resistance to flow; a physical property of a substance that is dependent on the friction of its component molecules as they slide by one another.

vis·cos·i·ty

(vis-kos'i-tē),
In general, the resistance to flow or alteration of shape by any substance as a result of molecular cohesion; most frequently applied to liquids as the resistance of a fluid to flow because of a shearing force.
[L. viscositas, fr. viscosus, viscous]

viscosity

An MRI term for a measure of a fluid’s resistance to deformity by shear or tensile stress, which affects its mobility and therefore its intensity in an image.

viscosity

The tendency of a fluid to resist flow or the quality of resistance to flow; viscosity is measured with a viscometer to assess hyperviscosity syndromes associated with monoclonal gammopathies, rheumatoid arthritis, SLE, hyperfibrinogenemia Ref range 1.4-1.8 relative to water. See Apparent viscosity. Cf Specific gravity.

vis·cos·i·ty

(vis-kos'i-tē)
In general, the resistance to flow or alteration of shape by any substance as a result of molecular cohesion; most frequently applied to liquids as the resistance of a fluid to flow because of a shearing force.
[L. viscositas, fr. viscosus, viscous]

viscosity

  1. the property of stickiness by which substances resist change of shape.
  2. a measure of the ease with which layers of fluid pass each other.

vis·cos·i·ty

(vis-kos'i-tē)
In general, the resistance to flow or alteration of shape by any substance as a result of molecular cohesion.
[L. viscositas, fr. viscosus, viscous]
References in periodicals archive ?
The inlet-duct-grid topology that was chosen for the inviscid solution used 101 points in the aircraft station direction, 45 points along the waterline, and 21 points in the butt-line direction.
This study focuses on the transition between absolute instability (AI) and convective instability (CI) for a compressible inviscid shear layer, which are dominated by modes with zero group velocity.
To recapitulate on the parallel nature of hydrodynamics with relativity, it is useful to note that Einstein remarked in "On the 100th anniversary of Lord Kelvin's birth" on Kelvin's circulation theorem that this development was one of Kelvin's most significant results that provided an early link between inviscid fluid mechanics and topology.
where W is the vector of dependent variables, [F.sub.x] and [F.sub.y] are the inviscid flux vectors, and S is the vector of source terms.
The inviscid fluxes are calculated using the fifth-order weighted essentially nonoscillatory (WENO) scheme, while the central differencing technique is applied to the viscous fluxes.
The above equation has similar features to the inviscid Burgers equation.
Thus, the boundary conditions for the velocity components are essentially the same as in the case of inviscid flow (we need only zero normal velocity at the boundaries).
Mathematical modeling of two-dimensional flows with detonation waves (DW) as a result of solving of the Euler equations for the inviscid gas supplemented by the chemical reaction kinetics model originates in the late 1970s [1, 2].
Leal, "Numerical study of the oscillations of a non-spherical bubble in an inviscid, incompressible liquid.
Internal waves of the ocean can be modeled in terms of mathematical equations using the ideal fluids assumptions (incompressible and inviscid) of mass conservation laws and the law of momentary vapor.
The moment-flux correction coefficient a is set as 1 in accordance with the inviscid assumption and with experimental findings.
where Q is the vector of the conserved variables, E, F, G are the inviscid flux vectors, and [E.sub.v], [F.sub.v], [G.sub.v] are the viscous flux vectors.