viscosity

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Related to inviscid: Incompressible flow

viscosity

 [vis-kos´ĭ-te]
resistance to flow; a physical property of a substance that is dependent on the friction of its component molecules as they slide by one another.

vis·cos·i·ty

(vis-kos'i-tē),
In general, the resistance to flow or alteration of shape by any substance as a result of molecular cohesion; most frequently applied to liquids as the resistance of a fluid to flow because of a shearing force.
[L. viscositas, fr. viscosus, viscous]

viscosity

/vis·cos·i·ty/ (vis-kos´ĭ-te) resistance to flow; a physical property of a substance that is dependent on the friction of its component molecules as they slide by one another.

viscosity

[viskos′itē]
Etymology: L, viscosus, sticky
the ability or inability of a fluid solution to flow easily. A solution that has high viscosity is relatively thick and flows slowly because of the adhesive effect of adjacent molecules. - viscid, viscous, adj.

viscosity

An MRI term for a measure of a fluid’s resistance to deformity by shear or tensile stress, which affects its mobility and therefore its intensity in an image.

viscosity

The tendency of a fluid to resist flow or the quality of resistance to flow; viscosity is measured with a viscometer to assess hyperviscosity syndromes associated with monoclonal gammopathies, rheumatoid arthritis, SLE, hyperfibrinogenemia Ref range 1.4-1.8 relative to water. See Apparent viscosity. Cf Specific gravity.

vis·cos·i·ty

(vis-kos'i-tē)
In general, the resistance to flow or alteration of shape by any substance as a result of molecular cohesion; most frequently applied to liquids as the resistance of a fluid to flow because of a shearing force.
[L. viscositas, fr. viscosus, viscous]

viscosity

  1. the property of stickiness by which substances resist change of shape.
  2. a measure of the ease with which layers of fluid pass each other.

viscosity

the property of a fluid medium that provides resistance to motion of the fluid itself or of an object moving through it. Also can be considered to be friction within fluids.

viscosity

resistance to flow/deformation, due to molecular cohesion

viscosity (vis·kôˑ·s·tē),

n the degree of resistance of a liquid to flow.

vis·cos·i·ty

(vis-kos'i-tē)
In general, the resistance to flow or alteration of shape by any substance as a result of molecular cohesion.
[L. viscositas, fr. viscosus, viscous]

viscosity (viskos´itē),

n the ability or inability of a fluid solution to flow easily. High viscosity indicates a slowflowing fluid.

viscosity

resistance to flow; a physical property of a substance that is dependent on the friction of its component molecules as they slide by one another.
References in periodicals archive ?
Assuming the electrical conductivity to be infinite and the direction of magnetic field to be tangential to the trajectories of the gas particles, the governing equations for one dimensional, inviscid, unsteady motion of non-ideal gas in presence of magnetic field may be written as Rosenau and Frankenthal [6] and Srivastava [7]
FLO22 provides some advantages: The first benefit is good accuracy even considering the inviscid flow assumption.
We start considering a specific tidal wave of amplitude A, frequency 00 and wave length [lambda], propagating in undisturbed and inviscid shallow waters, of variable depth h(x).
Engineering and scientific software programs, including: Inviscid flow solver and streamline pressure graphical display, CARMS Markov reliability analysis with spreadsheet/graphical interface, STARS for viewing constellations and other objects in the nighttime sky, TRACK Earth orbiting satellite tracking display, QField 2D Finite Element Analysis Program for heat/stress/electromagnetics, and the COSMIC software catalog.
1 was derived from linear wave theory, which assumes that water is inviscid (Denny 1988), whereas the formation of a boundary layer requires viscosity (Denny 1988, Vogel 1994).
Figure 1 schematically illustrates how the gas pressure required to fill the mold cavity can be lower than the required entrance pressure for conventional injection molding because of the effective transmission of pressure by the inviscid gas.
Although the practical applications of the one-dimensional Euler equations are limited, virtually all numerical algorithms for inviscid compressible flow in two and three dimensions owe their origin to techniques developed in the context of the one-dimensional Euler equations.
These singular flows correspond to solutions of the classical Euler equations from inviscid fluid dynamics, called vortex sheets.
Based on the assumption of high speed inviscid droplet (We [right arrow] [infinity] and Z [right arrow] 0), the breakup length can be derived and written as
The good agreement obtained between the present numerical results and experimental findings attested to the validity of the simple physical model used (see (4) describing inviscid flow) and the efficiency of the used numerical scheme.
xxxt] and f(t, x) = 0 corresponds to the original Rosenau equation and includes the linear (first-order) wave equation, the inviscid and viscous Burgers equations, the RLW, modified RLW, and generalized RLW equations, the Korteweg-de Vries (KdV) equation, the K(m, n) Rosenau-Hyman equation, the Camassa-Holm equation, the Olver-Rosenau equation, the Kawahara equation, the Cooper-Shepherd-Sodano equation, and combinations thereof; these equations are presented in Table 1.