viscosity

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Related to inviscid: Incompressible flow

viscosity

 [vis-kos´ĭ-te]
resistance to flow; a physical property of a substance that is dependent on the friction of its component molecules as they slide by one another.

vis·cos·i·ty

(vis-kos'i-tē),
In general, the resistance to flow or alteration of shape by any substance as a result of molecular cohesion; most frequently applied to liquids as the resistance of a fluid to flow because of a shearing force.
[L. viscositas, fr. viscosus, viscous]

viscosity

/vis·cos·i·ty/ (vis-kos´ĭ-te) resistance to flow; a physical property of a substance that is dependent on the friction of its component molecules as they slide by one another.

viscosity

[viskos′itē]
Etymology: L, viscosus, sticky
the ability or inability of a fluid solution to flow easily. A solution that has high viscosity is relatively thick and flows slowly because of the adhesive effect of adjacent molecules. - viscid, viscous, adj.

viscosity

An MRI term for a measure of a fluid’s resistance to deformity by shear or tensile stress, which affects its mobility and therefore its intensity in an image.

viscosity

The tendency of a fluid to resist flow or the quality of resistance to flow; viscosity is measured with a viscometer to assess hyperviscosity syndromes associated with monoclonal gammopathies, rheumatoid arthritis, SLE, hyperfibrinogenemia Ref range 1.4-1.8 relative to water. See Apparent viscosity. Cf Specific gravity.

vis·cos·i·ty

(vis-kos'i-tē)
In general, the resistance to flow or alteration of shape by any substance as a result of molecular cohesion; most frequently applied to liquids as the resistance of a fluid to flow because of a shearing force.
[L. viscositas, fr. viscosus, viscous]

viscosity

  1. the property of stickiness by which substances resist change of shape.
  2. a measure of the ease with which layers of fluid pass each other.

viscosity

the property of a fluid medium that provides resistance to motion of the fluid itself or of an object moving through it. Also can be considered to be friction within fluids.

viscosity

resistance to flow/deformation, due to molecular cohesion

viscosity (vis·kôˑ·s·tē),

n the degree of resistance of a liquid to flow.

vis·cos·i·ty

(vis-kos'i-tē)
In general, the resistance to flow or alteration of shape by any substance as a result of molecular cohesion.
[L. viscositas, fr. viscosus, viscous]

viscosity (viskos´itē),

n the ability or inability of a fluid solution to flow easily. High viscosity indicates a slowflowing fluid.

viscosity

resistance to flow; a physical property of a substance that is dependent on the friction of its component molecules as they slide by one another.
References in periodicals archive ?
Consider a system of three inviscid and fixed vortex filaments having strengths [[GAMMA].
For more information about Inviscid Software, LLC, visit http://www.
In the present paper, the nonstandard analysis is used to derive the jump conditions across the shock wave in one-dimensional, unsteady, inviscid flow of nonideal gas in the presence of magnetic field.
FLO22 provides some advantages: The first benefit is good accuracy even considering the inviscid flow assumption.
The low Mach numbers involved allows us to safely assume an incompressible airflow and we also assume the flow is inviscid and irrotational.
This equation bears a strong resemblance to the velocity potential equation for two-dimensional compressible flow in an ideal inviscid fluid, a classical problem in hydrodynamics.
Figure 1 schematically illustrates how the gas pressure required to fill the mold cavity can be lower than the required entrance pressure for conventional injection molding because of the effective transmission of pressure by the inviscid gas.
Although the practical applications of the one-dimensional Euler equations are limited, virtually all numerical algorithms for inviscid compressible flow in two and three dimensions owe their origin to techniques developed in the context of the one-dimensional Euler equations.
Because the spunbonding air-drawing process in the drafting assembly spinning occurs in a very short time, a two-dimensional, steady, inviscid turbulent flow of a perfect gas in the absence of body forces is considered.
Swimming of a two-dimensional flexible plate at variable forward speeds in an inviscid fluid.