invest

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invest

 [in-vest´]
1. to envelop in or cover another tissue or part (as fascia).
2. to surround, envelop, or embed in an investment material.
References in periodicals archive ?
Retail investors owned most of the stock-market accounts, cornering 97 percent of the total accounts while institutional investors held the remaining.
Ashley Alder, Chair of the IOSCO Board and the Chief Executive Officer of the Hong Kong Securities and Futures Commission, said: 'The IOSCO World Investor Week not only effectively communicates key messages to market participants regarding investor education, investor protection and financial literacy but also encourages and facilitates new initiatives among our members.'
Cho said Shinhan Financial Group is now focusing on attracting investors in other regions in a bid to boost the group's overseas businesses.
Noble says through angel investors, entrepreneurs have access not only to equity capital, but also to experience and business advice, which can prove crucial as they move forward.
Bredahl explained private equity investors want to make money while they own the investment in an operating company--as the company turns a quarterly profit--and also want to make a profit when they sell that interest.
For more details about the research in the Investor Perception Study, Asia 2005/2006: Winning companies, winning strategies, contact at +44 20 7251 7520 or e-mail claire.hunte@thecrossbordergroup.com.
Still, at least for foreign investors, viewing Argentina and some of its neighbors as a juicy investment prospect is looking at the glass as half-full.
Thus while the Tokyo market is beginning to show signs of being top-heavy on the upside amidst growing concern of a cyclical peak in the economy and corporate profits, I believe that investors should not be overly concerned about the short-term, but instead should keep the big picture in mind and basically maintain a "buy on weakness" stance toward Japan.
On another front, groups of investors are using the power of shareholder 2resolutions--which mandate yes or no votes on specific practices at corporate annual meetings--to affect company policies on climate change.

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