invert

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in·vert

(in'vert),
1. In chemistry, subjected to inversion, for example, invert sugar.
2. To reverse in direction, sequence, or effect.
3. Archaic term for a homosexual.
See: inversion.

invert

(ĭn-vûrt′)
v. in·verted, in·verting, in·verts
v.tr.
1. To turn inside out or upside down: invert an hourglass.
2. To reverse the position, order, or condition of: invert the subject and predicate of a sentence.
n. (ĭn′vûrt′)
Psychology
a. One who takes on the gender role of the opposite sex.
b. In the theory of Sigmund Freud, a homosexual person. No longer in scientific use.

in·vert′i·ble adj.

invert

(ĭn-vĕrt′)
1. To turn inside out or upside down.
2. To bend the foot in at the ankle so that the sole is facing toward the inside of the leg.
References in periodicals archive ?
The last five times the 2-year and 10-year have inverted they have been followed by a recession.
With pain fresh from the market downturn in the fourth quarter of 2018, it is understandable to be concerned and worried about what future markets may hold with what I have stated about inverted yield curves implying an impending recession.
The yield curve doesn't always invert when it gets this flat.
Correction is, of course, markets jargon for "down 10 percent." But unlike an inverted yield curve, corrections aren't reason to panic.
These are squares which when inverted turn into their own transpose!
Once in a blue moon, however, short-term interest rates rise above long-term interest rates, resulting in an inverted yield curve.
The yield curve gained some prominence five years ago, when it inverted in April 2000, just six months ahead of the beginning of the 2000-2001 recession.
The yield curve in both the United Kingdom and Australia has been inverted for some time now, for example, but neither country shows signs of a recession.
While the yield curve accurately anticipated a recession in 2000, it also inverted in the summer of 1998, predicting a recession that never materialized.
Neil Blender: Could twist it all the way around and come in like a frontside invert
Doing a traditional invert and turning the nose inward, forcing the tail to swing out and your back foot to drop.
It was the hardest invert for me to learn and is still an ongoing battle in my trick arsenal.