inverted-U hypothesis

inverted-U hypothesis

the proposition that performance on a task progressively improves with increases in arousal up to an optimum point, beyond which further increases in arousal lead to progressive decrements in performance. For example, in sport optimal performance is held to occur at a moderate level of arousal. Also known as the Yerkes-Dodson law.
References in periodicals archive ?
However, it is thought that one of the major problems with the inverted-U hypothesis as an explanation for the relationship between arousal and performance is the way in which activation and arousal are operationalised (Sapolsky, 2015).
2] estimate would be taken as evidence in support of the Kuznets inverted-U hypothesis.
From this standpoint the inverted-U hypothesis may again be able to explain inconsistent findings on the impact of advertising context on [A.
This reasoning translates into an interesting additional test of the inverted-U hypothesis.
Conventional theory, known as the inverted-U hypothesis, asserts that advertising is expected to increase with concentration at first, but to decrease at very high levels of concentration because collusion to avoid advertising costs becomes easier.
In a recent article appearing in this journal, Ram |5~ presents evidence from the United States contradicting the Kuznets inverted-U hypothesis associated with income inequality, which states that inequality would initially increase with economic development but then would fall eventually |3; 4~.