inverted repeat


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in·vert·ed re·peat

(in-vert'ĕd rē-pēt'),
A sequence of nucleotides that is repeated nearly without change except in the opposite direction, usually at some point distant from the original sequence; often associated with gene insertion.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

inverted repeat (IR)

a short sequence in a duplex DNA molecule which is repeated in the reverse orientation, either immediately adjacent or after an intervening sequence

After denaturing a duplex containing an inverted repeat, the single-stranded DNA may fold back and form a HAIRPIN or hairpin loop upon renaturing. Compare DIRECT REPEAT.

Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
Although these two sequences were not found in the IGS rDNA sequences of the two pig nodule worms examined in this study, two similar sites, with sequences of 57GCTGGTGT-37 93 bp upstream of the 5' end of direct repeat B and of 5,-CCTGGCGG-37 9bp downstream of the 3' end of inverted repeat I, were found in the IGS rDNA sequences of O.
The palindrome in EMBOSS 6.3.1 [24] (http://mobyle .pasteur.fr/cgi-bin/portal.py?#forms::palindrome) was used to identify inverted repeats in the Oesophagostomum species.
Stowaway: A new family of inverted repeat elements associated with the genes of both monocotyledonous and dicotyledonous plants.
They exhibit a conserved quadripartite structure consisting of one large single copy (LSC) region, one small single copy (SSC) region, and two copies of inverted repeats (IR).
Different oligonucleotides with inverted repeats were designed to form hairpin loop structures to test efficiency of the sodium bisulfite reaction method.
The amplification products are stem-loop DNA structures with several inverted repeats of the target and cauliflower-like structures with multiple loops, yielding >500 [micro]g/mL.
ISTN3X; 96% identical), comprising one of Tn3-like inverted repeats and putative coding regions for transposase, resolvase (also called repressor), and ampicillin resistance.