inverted papilloma


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in·vert·ed pap·il·lo·ma

an eplithelial tumor of the urinary bladder or nasal cavity in which proliferating epithelium is invaginated beneath the surface and is more smoothly rounded than in other papillomas.

inverted papilloma

ENT An inverted or exophytic tumor of nasal cavity and paranasal sinuses, which recurs in ±23 of cases; malignancy develops in 2% Surgical pathology A proliferation of thin epithelium overlying papillary fibrovascular fronds, found in either transitional epithelium–renal pelvis, ureters, bladder, urethra or stratified cuboidal epithelium–paranasal region,34 of Pts also had HPV types 6 and 11 and upper respiratory tract lesions
References in periodicals archive ?
Etiological role of human papillomavirus infection for inverted papilloma of the bladder.
A Case Report with a review of ureteral and renal pelvic inverted papillomas.
Human papillomavirus and p16 expression in inverted papillomas of the urinary bladder.
The recurrent inverted papilloma was treated via the same endoscopic KTP-532 laser approach, and the patient remained disease-free at 2.
Lund reviewed 20 series totaling 1,287 cases of inverted papilloma published from 1977 through 1998 and reported recurrence rates of 58% after conservative intranasal removal, 14% after radical removal, and 18% after endoscopic removal.
Management of inverted papilloma of the nose and paranasal sinuses.
Optimum management of inverted papilloma, l Laryngol Otol 2000;114(3): 194-7.
The introduction of endoscopes has enhanced our ability to diagnose and manage many nasal diseases, and most surgeons now advocate this more conservative approach for the treatment of inverted papillomas, keeping in mind its low associated recurrence rates.
We performed endoscopic resection on six patients who had inverted papillomas of the nasal cavity.
5-7) In this article, we report our experience with endoscopic endonasal sinus surgery in the treatment of six patients with inverted papillomas.
Since August 1995, we have used endoscopic excision to treat six patients--five men and one woman, aged 30 to 65 years (mean: 49)--with inverted papillomas of the nose and paranasal sinuses.
The search for an ideal surgical approach to removing inverted papillomas has been fairly controversial, with proponents of radical surgery vying with those who support endoscopic endonasal procedures.