invertebrate


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invertebrate

 [in-ver´tĕ-brāt]
1. having no vertebral column.
2. any animal that has no vertebral column.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

in·ver·te·brate

(in-ver'tĕ-brāt),
1. Not possessed of a spinal or vertebral column.
2. Any animal that has no spinal column.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

invertebrate

(ĭn-vûr′tə-brĭt, -brāt′)
adj.
1. Lacking a backbone or spinal column; not vertebrate.
2. Of or relating to invertebrates: invertebrate zoology.
n.
An animal, such as an insect or mollusk, that lacks a backbone or spinal column.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

in·ver·te·brate

(in-vĕr'tĕ-brăt)
1. Not possessed of a spinal or vertebral column.
2. (in-vĕr'tĕ-brāt) Any animal that has no spinal column.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

invertebrate

any animal that does not possess a backbone.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
PRLC chair Juan Carlos Gonzalez, a professor at the University of the Philippines Los Banos, said the first-time inclusion of invertebrates was made possible by the strong collaboration between scientists and institutions, allowing more knowledge sharing and research about species otherwise ignored.
To determine whether marine invertebrate species present and absent in conservation lists differed in average weight, the difference between population means from independent samples was tested (Dytham, 2013), setting a significance level of 0.05.
Ultimately, people seeking to broaden their understanding of marine invertebrate larvae in life cycles and in the sea will find in this book a rich resource.
It begins with a guide to Latin and Greek plurals and root words, with examples from invertebrates, and the terms come with easily understood pronunciation guides.
Dr Sarah Glynn, manager of the Great North Museum: Hancock says: "Invertebrates are more numerous than all the birds, reptiles, mammals and fish on earth put together.
Many studies have shown that aquatic invertebrate standing stock biomass is influenced or even driven by variation in hydroperiod, colonization rates-strategies, and species-specific persistence or life history strategies (Voigts, 1976; Gray et al., 1999; Anderson and Smith, 2000; de Szalay and Resh, 2000; Anderson and Smith, 2004).
A sharp decline in the abundance macro- invertebrate groups were recorded during autumn season (n= 382) and significantly higher during winter and spring seasons (n= 1631) and (n= 2415) respectively.
The study found similar widespread changes in both large vertebrates and invertebrates, with an on-going decline in invertebrates surprising scientists, as they had previously been viewed as nature's survivors.
'Our analysis showed clearly that many British river invertebrates are sensitive to climate,' Vaughn said.
The survey will be led by local freshwater invertebrate expert Dr Ellen Pisolkar with Alex Hale, from the Environment Agency.
However, whilst there is wide recognition of the importance of recovery teams to oversee conservation programs that may be both biologically and politically complex, and extend over many years, there are only three recognised invertebrate 'recovery' teams in Victoria (for the Giant Gippsland earthworm, the Eltham copper butterfly and the Ancient greenling damselfly), and these are noted below.
20) fascinating because I know of another example of an invertebrate animal possessing a "strictly vertebrate" quality.