inversion

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inversion

 [in-ver´zhun]
1. a turning inward, inside out, or other reversal of the normal relation of a part.
2. in psychiatry, a term used by Freud for homosexuality.
3. a chromosomal aberration due to the inverted reunion of the middle segment after breakage of a chromosome at two points, resulting in a change in sequence of genes or nucleotides.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

in·ver·sion

(in-ver'zhŭn),
1. A turning inward, upside down, or in any direction contrary to the existing one.
2. Conversion of a disaccharide or polysaccharide by hydrolysis into a monosaccharide; specifically, the hydrolysis of sucrose to d-glucose and d-fructose; so called because of the change in optic rotation.
3. Alteration of a DNA molecule made by removing a fragment, reversing its orientation, and putting it back into place.
4. Heat-induced transition of silica, in which the quartz tridymite or cristobalite changes its physical properties as to thermal expansion.
5. Conversion of a chiral center into its mirror image.
[L. inverto, pp. -versus, to turn upside down, to turn about]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

inversion

(ĭn-vûr′zhən)
n.
1.
a. The act of inverting.
b. The state of being inverted.
2. Psychology In early psychology, behavior or attitudes in an individual considered typical of the opposite sex, including sexual attraction to members of one's own sex. No longer in technical use.
3. Chemistry Conversion of a substance in which the direction of optical rotation is reversed, from the dextrorotatory to the levorotatory or from the levorotatory to the dextrorotatory form.
4. Genetics A chromosomal rearrangement in which a segment of the chromosome breaks off and reattaches in the reverse direction.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

inversion

Orthopedics A frontal plane movement of the foot, where the plantar surface is tilted to face the midline of the body or the medial sagittal plane; the axis of motion lies on the sagittal and transverse planes; a fixed inverted position is referred to as a varus deformity
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

in·ver·sion

(in-vĕr'zhŭn)
1. A turning inward, upside down, or in any direction contrary to the existing one.
2. Conversion of a disaccharide or polysaccharide by hydrolysis into a monosaccharide; specifically, the hydrolysis of sucrose to d-glucose and d-fructose; so called because of the change in optic rotation.
3. Alteration of a DNA molecule made by removing a fragment, reversing its orientation, and putting it back into place.
4. Heat-induced transition of silica, in which the quartz tridymite or cristobalite changes its physical properties as to thermal expansion.
[L. inverto, pp. -versus, to turn upside down, to turn about]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

inversion

a CHROMOSOMAL MUTATION in which a segment becomes reversed and, although there is no loss or gain of genetic material, there may be a positive or negative POSITION EFFECT on the phenotype.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005

in·ver·sion

(in-vĕr'zhŭn)
A turning inward, upside down, or in any direction contrary to the existing one.
[L. inverto, pp. -versus, to turn upside down, to turn about]
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
Like its representation of inversive demonic kingship, the play's representation of libido dominandi as theft is doubly reflexive: it not only characterizes Bolingbroke's usurpation but it also mirrors Richard's reign and thence articulates a rather despairing cyclical view of history.
Finally, note that in the linear case one works with the 1-forms, defined over the inversive difference field of real numbers.
In this subsection the construction of the inversive difference field, defined by system equations (4), is shown in detail.
In general, the field K is not inversive, meaning that some [zeta] [member of] K may not have pre-image in K, i.e., [[sigma].sup.-1]; [zeta] [??]K.
Note that the independent variables of the field K are given by the elements of the set C, whereas the inversive closure K* contains, in addition, the variables [[sigma].sup.-1] yi and [sigma].sup.-1] [u.sub.,[kappa] [greater than or equal to] 1, where [sigma].sup.-1] means the i-time application of the backward-shift operator [[sigma].sup.-1].
The following examples illustrate the necessity of the submersivity assumption and the construction of the inversive closure K*.
The second difficulty yields that the new variables of the inversive closure, depending on t, have to be chosen to be smooth at each dense point t of the time scale.
Then the inversive closure of K can be chosen as the field of meromorphic functions in a finite number of variables [x.sub.1], [x.sub.2], [u.sup.[k]], [z.sup.<-l>], k [greater than or equal to] 0, l [greater than or equal to] 1, where [z.sup.<-1>] = [[sigma].sup.-1.sub.f] (z) and [z.sup.<-l>] = [[sigma].sup.-1.sub.f] ([z.sup.<-l+1>]).
Alternatively, the inversive closure can be chosen as a field of meromorphic functions in a finite number of variables [x.sub.1], [x.sub.2], [u.sup.[k]], [x.sup.<-l>.sub.2], k [greater than or equal to] 0, l [greater than or equal to] 1, where [x.sup.<-l>.sub.2] 1) = [[sigma].sup.-1.sub.f] ([x.sub.2]) and [x.sup.<-l>.sub.2] = [[sigma].sup.-1.sub.f] ([x.sup.<-l+1>.sub.2]).
A third possibility is to choose z = [x.sub.1] and define inversive closure [K.sup.*] as a field of meromorphic functions in a finite number of variables [x.sub.1], [x.sub.2], [u.sup.[k]], [x.sup.<-l>.sub.1], k [greater than or equal to] 0, l [greater than or equal to] 1, where [x.sup.<-1>.sub.1] = [[sigma].sup.-1.sub.f] ([x.sub.1]) and [x.sup.<-l>.sub.1] = [[sigma].sup.-1.sub.f] ([x.sup.<-l-1>.sub.1]).
Since [sigma] is injective, there exists a [sigma]-differential overfield [K.sup.*], called the inversive closure of K, such that [sigma] can be extended to [K.sup.*] and this extension is an automorphism of [K.sup.*] (see [8]).