inversion recovery


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in·ver·sion re·cov·er·y

a magnetic resonance pulse sequence in which a series of 180° magnetic field inversions is followed by a spin echo sequence for signal detection; of note, during recovery, the longitudinal magnetization vector passes through zero.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

inversion recovery

An MRI term for an imaging sequence involving successive 180º and 90º pulses, after which a heavily T1-weighted signal is obtained. The inversion recovery sequence is specified in terms of inversion time (TI), repetition time (TR) and echo time (TE).
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

inversion recovery

In magnetic resonance imaging, a standard pulse sequence used to produce T1-weighted images.
See also: recovery
Medical Dictionary, © 2009 Farlex and Partners
References in periodicals archive ?
Comparison among conventional spin echo (CSE), fast spin echo (FSE) and fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) was made to investigate the performance of each pulse sequence with the variation of important pulse sequence parameters such as repetition time (TR) and echo time (TE).
(b) Axial double inversion recovery sequence demonstrates increased focal narrowing of the descending thoracic aorta, measuring 1.6 cm in diameter.
A B C (1) Periodic sharp (1) Myoclonus wave complexes on Routine (2) Visual or EEG during an investigations that cerebellar signs illness of any do not indicate an duration alternative (3) Pyramidal/ diagnosis extrapyramidal signs (2) Positive 14-3-3 CSF assay in (4) Akinetic mutism patients with a disease duration of less than 2 years (3) MRI high signal abnormalities in caudate nucleus and/ or putamen on diffusion weighted or fluid attenuation inversion recovery imaging (1) Definite sCJD = diagnosed by standard neuropathological techniques; and/or immunocytochemically and/or Western blot confirmed protease-resistant PrP and/or presence of scrapie-associated fibrils.
A [T.sub.1]-weighted and STIR (short [T.sub.1] inversion recovery) MRI scan of the wrist, reconstructed in axial and coronal planes was performed (Fig.
Conventional MRI techniques for imaging MS are very insensitive for detection of focal cortical MS lesions: T2-weighted spin echo (T2-SE) and fluid attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) imaging identify around 2/3rds of pathologically identified WM lesions; yet respectively, they miss up to 97% and 95% of cortical lesions [6].
For the last decade, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with fluid attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) and T1-weighted sequences has been debated for superiority over noninvasive ways in the diagnosis of all types of meningeal diseases.
* short- and long-axis inversion recovery delayed-enhancement sequences to identify infarcted myocardial tissue
Si el tiempo de inversion es corto, se obtiene una imagen en la cual se cancela la senal del tejido graso; a esta secuencia se le denomina STIR (Short TI Inversion Recovery).
One measurement, called fluid-attenuated inversion recovery, clearly distinguished between MRIs taken during the first three hours and those taken later.
(7), (8), (12) Recently, specific MRI findings have been described with fluid attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) and diffusion sequences.
Core sequences of the brain should include sagittal and axial Fluid Attenuated Inversion Recovery (FLAIR); axial T2; and axial T1 both pre-and post-gadolinium.