inverse square law


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law

 [law]
a uniform or constant fact or principle. For specific named laws, see under the name.
law of independent assortment the members of gene pairs segregate independently during meiosis; see also mendel's laws.
inverse square law the intensity of radiation is inversely proportional to the square of the distance from the source of radiation.
law of segregation in each generation the ratio of (a) pure dominants, (b) dominants giving descendants in the proportion of three dominants to one recessive, and (c) pure recessives is 1:2:1. This ratio follows from the fact that the two alleles of a gene cannot be a part of a single gamete, but must segregate to different gametes. See also mendel's laws.

in·verse square law

as applied to point sources, the intensity of radiation diminishes in proportion to the square of the distance from the source.

inverse square law

a law stating that the amount of radiation reaching a surface is inversely proportional to the square of the distance between the source and the surface. For example, a person standing 1 m from a patient being treated with radium is exposed to four times more radiation than a person standing 2 m from the patient.

in·verse square law

(in'vĕrs skwār law)
In radiation therapy, proposition that intensity of a radiation beam is inversely proportional to the square of the distance from the source of radiation.

inverse square law

for a given exposure the amount of radiation falling on a given area of radiographic film varies inversely as the square of the distance of that area from the source of irradiation in the focal spot.
References in periodicals archive ?
While in some studies Lotka's inverse square law holds (e.
Ander, the investigators tested the inverse square law by comparing actual measurements with values predicted using Newton's law.
Experimental examination of the gravitational inverse square law.
For now, physicists are not rushing to amend the inverse square law or declare the existence of a new force.
If we surmise that the inverse square law is only valid for r [much greater than] R, one could incorporate higher order gravitational effects by generalising the right-hand side of (4) to a polynomial.
Comparison is then given with predictions using the usual integration of the inverse square law (9).
In the form (2) Newton's law permits a unique generalisation by adding a term of the same order but which can preserve the inverse square law outside of spherical masses,
The first case (the two third power formula) is one form of the famous Kepler third law of motion and if differentiated twice gives the inverse square law [d.
which is Newton's Inverse Square Law of 1687 [9], but with an effective mass M(1 + [alpha]/2 + .