inventory

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inventory

 [in´ven-tor″e]
a comprehensive list of personality traits, aptitudes, and interests.
California Personality inventory CPI; a self-report, true-false questionnaire designed to measure aspects of personality style. It is generally used in counseling situations or for less than severe psychopathology.
Millon Clinical Multiaxial inventory MCMI; a true-false, self-report questionnaire designed to produce a profile of the personality style and structure underlying mental disorders.
Minnesota Multiphasic Personality inventory MMPI; a psychological test in questionnaire form in which the answers to true-false statements show dimensions of the subject's personality structure and provide comparison with responses made by persons in various diagnostic categories.

in·ven·tor·y

(in'ven-tōr-ē),
A detailed, often descriptive, list of items, used in psychological and psychiatric assessment of various behavioral phenomena. See: construct (2).

inventory

Psychometrics A questionnaire or test designed to measure aptitudes, interest or traits. See Hogean Personality Inventory, Miller Clinical Inventory, Multiaxial Inventory, MMPI, NEO Personality Inventory, Social Support Inventory, State-Trait Anxiety Inventory, Texas Primary Reading inventory, Tobacco Withdrawal Symptoms Inventory.

in·ven·tor·y

(in'vĕn-tōr-ē)
A detailed, often descriptive, list of items.

in·ven·tor·y

(in'vĕn-tōr-ē)
A detailed, often descriptive, list of items, tools, devices, dressings, or materials.
References in periodicals archive ?
The paper offers a systematic description of consonant system of Pakistani Standard English (PSE) and compares it with British Standard English (BSE) keeping in view the inventorial, realizational, incidental and distributional differences.
Concern for these aspects of eschatology could well release the subject from a narrowly anthropological concept of its own task, while avoiding the excessively inventorial approach of the classical heuristic schemes" (262).
One could presume that the genre of tax registers, which are primarily "inventorial and quantitative," would lend itself well to tables of comparison, or to lists that facilitate a quick insight into the contents of the register.