invasive


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invasive

 [in-va´siv]
1. reaching or taking over surrounding tissues; see invasiveness (def. 2).
2. involving puncture or incision of the skin or insertion of an instrument or injection of foreign material into the body; said of diagnostic techniques and procedures.

in·va·sive

(in-vā'siv),
1. Denoting or characterized by invasion.
2. Denoting a procedure requiring insertion of an instrument or device into the body through the skin or a body orifice for diagnosis or treatment.

invasive

/in·va·sive/ (-siv)
1. having the quality of invasiveness.
2. involving puncture of the skin or insertion of an instrument or foreign material into the body; said of diagnostic techniques.

invasive

(ĭn-vā′sĭv)
adj.
a. Of or relating to a disease or condition that has a tendency to spread, especially into healthy tissue: an invasive carcinoma.
b. Of or relating to a medical procedure in which a part of the body is entered, as by puncture or incision.

in·va′sive·ly adv.
in·va′sive·ness n.

invasive

[invā′siv]
Etymology: L, in, within, vadere, to go
characterized by a tendency to spread, infiltrate, and intrude.

invasive

adjective Medtalk
1. Interventional Referring to therapy in which mucocutaneous barriers are violated–eg, invasive cardiology. Cf Non-invasive.
2. Diffuse, infiltrating Referring to the spread of a lesion, usually understood to be CA, beyond confining or natural boundaries. Cf Encapsulated.

in·va·sive

(in-vā'siv)
1. Denoting or characterized by invasion.
2. Denoting a procedure requiring insertion of an instrument or device into the body through the skin or a body orifice for diagnosis or treatment.

invasive

1. Involving entry to the body through a natural surface, usually referring to entry for diagnostic purposes.
2. Having a natural tendency to spread, as of a cancer.

Invasive

A diagnostic test that invades healthy tissue; in the case of venography, through an incision in a healthy vein.
Mentioned in: Thymoma, Venography

in·va·sive

(in-vā'siv)
Denoting a procedure requiring insertion of an instrument or device into the body through the skin or a body orifice for diagnosis or treatment.

invasive

1. having the quality of invasiveness.
2. involving puncture or incision of the skin or insertion of an instrument or foreign material into the body; said of diagnostic techniques.

Patient discussion about invasive

Q. How successful s minimally invasive surgery for knee replacements?

A. Approximately 300,000 knee replacements are performed each year in the United States. and it said that 90% of the people who had a total knee replacement report an improvement in their function. i searched the CDC statistics for failure of the surgery and couldn't find any info about it. but as i said- it's a very common surgery. my grandmother had a hip joint replacement due to arthritis, it helped.
here is something that might help you to prepare for the surgery:

http://orthoinfo.aaos.org/topic.cfm?topic=A00220#Understand the Procedure

good luck!!

Q. Has anyone had a minimally invasive partial knee replacement? How did it go and are you pleased? I will be having one in the next few weeks and would just like some input. Thanks...

A. Hmm... Never underwent it myself, but you may read some more here:
http://orthoinfo.aaos.org/topic.cfm?topic=A00405

and you may also watch it here:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Cm6_qxd3P3Q

Take care,

More discussions about invasive
References in periodicals archive ?
Despite this, the economic slowdown and unstable reimbursement policies in the region adversely affect the European market for non-invasive and minimally invasive cardiac output monitoring devices.
Although NSAIDs may neither alter the risk of developing an invasive GAS infection nor accelerate an established infection, these drugs can mollify the signs and symptoms of streptococcal infection, possibly delaying appropriate management and treatment (3).
While we support the planting of suitable non-natives, we never encourage the planting of invasive species (which can be native or not).
Recently, there has also been more invasive fungus found in the Santa Clara River, thanks to the African clawed frog.
The nonprofit Nature Conservancy owns some 1,500 preserves around the nation, where combating invasive species is a top priority, notes Rice.
G]enital HSV-2 infection may act in conjunction with HPV infection to modestly increase the risk of invasive cervical cancer," the investigators comment.
In conclusion, the identification of all organisms involved in polymicrobial invasive infections may require cultures of specimens from all accessible septic loci.
We present two outbreaks of invasive GAS infection in long-term care facilities in Hamilton, Ontario, Canada.
Stevens argues that if a new and more virulent strain of streptococcus had emerged, invasive strep infections would have been far more widespread.
We report the first serogrouping data from carried and invasive isolates obtained from children and adults in Malawi.
However, the usual invasive method for the measurement of glucose, based on frequent finger pricking, is highly uncomfortable and is not feasible to implement frequently, calling for a non-invasive alternative.

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