invalid

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in·va·lid

(in'vă-lid),
1. Weak; sick.
2. A person partially or completely disabled.
[L. in- neg. + validus, strong]

invalid

(ĭn′və-lĭd)
n.
One who is incapacitated by a chronic illness or disability.
adj.
1. Incapacitated by illness or injury.
2. Of, relating to, or intended for invalids.
tr.v. inva·lided, inva·liding, inva·lids
1. To incapacitate physically.
2. Chiefly British To release or exempt from duty because of ill health: "I was not quite sick enough to be invalided out, even though I was of no more use" (Mary Lee Settle).

in·va·lid

(in'vă-lid)
1. Weak; sick.
2. A person partially or completely disabled.
[L. in- neg. + validus, strong]

invalid

(ĭn′vă-lĭd) [L. in-, not, + validus, strong]
1. A former term for a person who is not well; weak. Use of the term is archaic.
2. Based on false premises, reasonings, or justifications.
References in periodicals archive ?
He had also apparently threatened violence towards those invalids who had witnessed the assault.
Francis was one of five invalids expelled from the Brickfields in 1862 for bad conduct.
These regulations provided the superintendent with an increasingly severe scale of punishment to be meted out to errant invalids.
Before the establishment of the Launceston Invalid Depot, the options for relief available to northern emancipist invalids were limited.
The Committee held that the rationale behind the government assuming responsibility for invalids was char with the advent of 'responsible' government there had been a loss of control over convicts and emancipists.
It is difficult to determine the exact numbers of invalids, especially female invalids, maintained in government charitable institutions until 1873.
See, for example, Piper, "Beyond"; Andrew Piper, "A Love of Liberty: The Manipulation of the Colonial Tasmanian Institutional System by Invalids," Journal of Australian Colonial History, 11 (2009): 73-100; Shayne Breen, Contested Places: Tasmania's Northern Districts From Ancient Times to 1900, (Hobart, 2001); and Shayne Breen, "Outdoor Poor Relief in Launceston, 1860-1880," Tasmanian Historical Research Association, Papers and Proceedings, 38, 1 (1991): 19-50.
For example, in 1861 there were fear invalids that were employed on full wages (a total of [pounds sterling]36) and rations as servants, with the rest being permitted a small sum monthly.
The conversion of the old female factory into a pauper invalid depot involved considerable expense and significant modifications.
Upon entry an invalid had to yield to inspection, classification, 'decontamination' and confiscation of personal property.
42) At the Launceston Invalid Depot, for example, the day commenced, in summer, with the ringing of the bell at 6.
As time went by, those administering invalid depots found it necessary to employ various punishments to counter breaches in discipline.