invalidism


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in·va·lid·ism

(in'vă-lid-izm),
The condition of being an invalid.

invalidism

(ĭn′və-lĭ-dĭz′əm)
n.
The condition of being chronically ill or disabled.
References in periodicals archive ?
It is possible to imagine this kind of frozen death-state as the final stage of a career of invalidism like Alice James's.
The "cult of female invalidism" celebrated in sentimental novels drew support from a burgeoning corpus of scientific literature that classified women's bodies as intrinsically infirm.
The discomfort of pregnancy and the pain of childbirth are surely not [more] than what often attends years of invalidism without hope of cure.
Most prisoners of that age are sex offenders, and most sex offenders walk with a stick in the hope that their invalidism will deter other prisoners from assaulting them."
David Daiches notes that "Ordered South" is "the only essay in which Louis parades his invalidism" and that "in all his other writing he compensates for his frequent illness by adopting a strenuously outdoor attitude or at least an authorial persona devoid of any physical disabilities" (31).
For Marcel and Swann, perception becomes the locus of conquest, virility, and action, for a reconfigured masculinity in which the higher orders of the Self, such as the intellect, imagination, and perception, are sexualized by the possessive libido, which has been denied physical expression by the narrator's invalidism.
Quoting Kierkegaard in the poem, "What We Want," she acknowledges life's vexations and sufferings--and takes refuge in writing, exploring the difficulties of invalidism and the anatomical enterprise of change as her daughter undergoes a surgical transformation from female to male.
In Jane Eyre Bronte examines tropical invalidism and geopolitical climate.
A longitudinal causal model of acrdiac invalidism following myocardial infarction.
Three of the sisters never ceased to be Victorians, escaping from responsibility into invalidism. They grew old and apart.
When one reads these t ales of lives shattered by acute invalidism, it is easy to understand why women might have aggressively sought out a potentially dangerous procedure.
As a consequence, women who did not participate in the wage economy found themselves forced into a state of idleness and purposelessness; consequently many upper-class women became what we would now call "depressed," and thus began an epidemic of "female invalidism."(53) Soon, a sickly wife came to be a symbol of status, reflecting the fact that only a successful and wealthy man could afford to support such a wife.