invagination

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invagination

 [in-vag″ĭ-na´shun]
1. the infolding of one part within another part of a structure, as of the blastula during gastrulation.
basilar invagination a developmental deformity of the occipital bone and upper end of the cervical spine in which the latter appears to have pushed the floor of the occipital bone upward; see also platybasia. Called also basilar impression.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

in·vag·i·na·tion

(in-vaj'i-nā'shŭn),
1. The ensheathing, enfolding, or insertion of a structure within itself or another.
See also: introversion, intussusception.
2. The state of being invaginated.
See also: introversion, intussusception.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

invagination

(ĭn-văj′ə-nā′shən)
n.
1. The act or process of invaginating or the condition of being invaginated.
2. An invaginated organ or part.
3. Embryology The infolding of a portion of the outer layer of a blastula in the formation of a gastrula.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

in·vag·i·na·tion

(in-vaj'i-nā'shŭn)
1. The ensheathing, enfolding, or insertion of a structure within itself or another.
2. The state of being invaginated.
See also: introversion, intussusception
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

invagination

A folding into or ensheathing. The process of invagination occurs in the early development of the embryo when part of the BLASTODERM folds inward so that the hollow sphere becomes cup-shaped and double-walled.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

invagination

an inpushing of a layer of cells, as in GASTRULATION or in the formation of the PROCTODAEUM.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005

in·vag·i·na·tion

(in-vaj'i-nā'shŭn)
Ensheathing, enfolding, or insertion of a structure within itself or another.
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
Tribe Trilepideae, one of the earliest diverging lineages from other Cyperoideae, is well characterised by the Trilepis-type embryo, which can be recognised by a flattened scutellum and a prominent invagination over the coleoptile.
The common openings corresponded to cytochalasin D-induced plasma membrane invaginations in size and appearance.
The roots from the un-compacted soil showed an elaborate cortical region with several layers of regularly arranged cells where aerenchyma evenly distributed, whereas in compacted soil some aerenchyma were squashed and disappeared by showing deep invaginations in cortex, e.g.
There are deep invaginations of the follicular cell layer (final folliculogenesis) and the nucleus moved to animal pole of the oocyte (diameter = 381, SD = 124, CrI = 67%, P11 = 7.5%, Tg1 = 25%).
Histopathology showed a single crateriform invagination connected with surface epidermis that was lined by double layer of epithelium.
We do not know the function or derivation of these invaginations in C.
In 1972, Schulze and Brand proposed a more detailed classification, including invaginations starting at the incisal edge or the top of the crown and also describing dysmorphic root configuration.29 (Figure 2)
Histologic analysis of adenomyomatosis is characterized by epithelial invaginations and smooth muscle proliferation.