invagination

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invagination

 [in-vag″ĭ-na´shun]
1. the infolding of one part within another part of a structure, as of the blastula during gastrulation.
basilar invagination a developmental deformity of the occipital bone and upper end of the cervical spine in which the latter appears to have pushed the floor of the occipital bone upward; see also platybasia. Called also basilar impression.

in·vag·i·na·tion

(in-vaj'i-nā'shŭn),
1. The ensheathing, enfolding, or insertion of a structure within itself or another.
See also: introversion, intussusception.
2. The state of being invaginated.
See also: introversion, intussusception.

invagination

/in·vag·i·na·tion/ (in-vaj″ĭ-na´shun)
1. the infolding of one part within another part of a structure, as of the blastula during gastrulation.

basilar invagination  a developmental deformity of the occipital bone and upper end of the cervical spine in which the latter appears to have pushed the floor of the occipital bone upward.

invagination

(ĭn-văj′ə-nā′shən)
n.
1. The act or process of invaginating or the condition of being invaginated.
2. An invaginated organ or part.
3. Embryology The infolding of a portion of the outer layer of a blastula in the formation of a gastrula.

invagination

[invaj′ənā′shən]
Etymology: L, in, within, vagina, sheath
1 a condition in which one part of a structure telescopes into another, as the intestine during peristalsis. If the invagination is extensive or involves a tumor or polyp, it may cause an intestinal obstruction, necessitating surgery.
2 surgery for repair of a hernia by replacement of the contents of the hernial sac in the abdominal cavity. General or spinal anesthesia may be used. See also hernia, intestinal obstruction, intussusception, peristalsis. invaginate, v.

in·vag·i·na·tion

(in-vaj'i-nā'shŭn)
1. The ensheathing, enfolding, or insertion of a structure within itself or another.
2. The state of being invaginated.
See also: introversion, intussusception

invagination

A folding into or ensheathing. The process of invagination occurs in the early development of the embryo when part of the BLASTODERM folds inward so that the hollow sphere becomes cup-shaped and double-walled.

invagination

an inpushing of a layer of cells, as in GASTRULATION or in the formation of the PROCTODAEUM.

in·vag·i·na·tion

(in-vaj'i-nā'shŭn)
Ensheathing, enfolding, or insertion of a structure within itself or another.

invagination

1. the infolding of one part within another part of a structure, as of the blastula during gastrulation.
2. intussusception.
References in periodicals archive ?
In contrast to the ovoid shaped full vesicles, the emptied vesicles displayed numerous invaginations or infolding of the cell wall (Fig.
In that study the most distinct resorption processes in primary molars were seen in patients where the permanent dentition showed ectodermal morphological characteristics such as taurodontia, invaginations and deviant crown and root shapes.
Histologic analysis of adenomyomatosis is characterized by epithelial invaginations and smooth muscle proliferation.
Internal darkened sclerotic invaginations usually visible around tracheal opening and along posteriorly-converging lines either side of VSQ.
Phagocytic activity captures copper and zinc in membrane-lined phagosomes, vesicles formed by invaginations of the cell membrane.
NC are defined as invaginations of the nuclear envelope (NE) that traverse the nucleoplasm, thus forming a ring-like nucleus.
The mechanism of action is due to the specific entry of squalamine into activated endothelial cells through membrane invaginations known as caveolae, and subsequent binding and chaperoning of calmodulin to an intracellular membrane compartment.
Cells showed pale nuclei with finely granular, evenly distributed chromatin, and occasional intranuclear cytoplasmic invaginations.
Invaginations of the tonoplast surround parts of the cytoplasm that are ultimately pinched off, resulting in lysosomal-like compartments within the vacuole.
The branchial apparatus consists of five pairs of mesodermal arches separated by four pairs of endodermal and ectodermal invaginations, called pouches and clefts, respectively, as demonstrated in figure 3.
12) Other frequent cytologic characteristics of papillary carcinoma are nuclear pseudoinclusions, representing invaginations of the cytoplasm, and nuclear grooves, resulting from infoldings of a redundant nuclear membrane.