invagination

(redirected from invaginations)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.

invagination

 [in-vag″ĭ-na´shun]
1. the infolding of one part within another part of a structure, as of the blastula during gastrulation.
basilar invagination a developmental deformity of the occipital bone and upper end of the cervical spine in which the latter appears to have pushed the floor of the occipital bone upward; see also platybasia. Called also basilar impression.

in·vag·i·na·tion

(in-vaj'i-nā'shŭn),
1. The ensheathing, enfolding, or insertion of a structure within itself or another.
See also: introversion, intussusception.
2. The state of being invaginated.
See also: introversion, intussusception.

invagination

/in·vag·i·na·tion/ (in-vaj″ĭ-na´shun)
1. the infolding of one part within another part of a structure, as of the blastula during gastrulation.

basilar invagination  a developmental deformity of the occipital bone and upper end of the cervical spine in which the latter appears to have pushed the floor of the occipital bone upward.

invagination

(ĭn-văj′ə-nā′shən)
n.
1. The act or process of invaginating or the condition of being invaginated.
2. An invaginated organ or part.
3. Embryology The infolding of a portion of the outer layer of a blastula in the formation of a gastrula.

invagination

[invaj′ənā′shən]
Etymology: L, in, within, vagina, sheath
1 a condition in which one part of a structure telescopes into another, as the intestine during peristalsis. If the invagination is extensive or involves a tumor or polyp, it may cause an intestinal obstruction, necessitating surgery.
2 surgery for repair of a hernia by replacement of the contents of the hernial sac in the abdominal cavity. General or spinal anesthesia may be used. See also hernia, intestinal obstruction, intussusception, peristalsis. invaginate, v.

in·vag·i·na·tion

(in-vaj'i-nā'shŭn)
1. The ensheathing, enfolding, or insertion of a structure within itself or another.
2. The state of being invaginated.
See also: introversion, intussusception

invagination

A folding into or ensheathing. The process of invagination occurs in the early development of the embryo when part of the BLASTODERM folds inward so that the hollow sphere becomes cup-shaped and double-walled.

invagination

an inpushing of a layer of cells, as in GASTRULATION or in the formation of the PROCTODAEUM.

in·vag·i·na·tion

(in-vaj'i-nā'shŭn)
Ensheathing, enfolding, or insertion of a structure within itself or another.

invagination

1. the infolding of one part within another part of a structure, as of the blastula during gastrulation.
2. intussusception.
References in periodicals archive ?
The apical organ located at the anterior end appears as a small invagination, brightly labeled with phallacidin and surrounded by four large epidermal cells (Fig.
In the latter crab, the depth of the basolateral invaginations and the number of mitochondria also appear to increase, with a closer degree of apposition between them (Compere et al.
The roots from the un-compacted soil showed an elaborate cortical region with several layers of regularly arranged cells where aerenchyma evenly distributed, whereas in compacted soil some aerenchyma were squashed and disappeared by showing deep invaginations in cortex, e.
Several genes codifying proteins essential for membrane invagination, iron transportation and reduction, maintaining the pH within the magnetosome and directly involved in magnetite nucleation and growth have been reported by a number of authors (Grunberg et al.
Paired discs that arise as invaginations of larval epidermis include the cephalic discs, trunk discs, and cerebral organ discs, which give rise to the juvenile head, trunk, and cerebral organs, respectively.
Our results show that Snai1 is a key regulator of crypt base columnar cells, a type of stem cell found in the invaginations or crypts that exist at the base of the many villi found in the intestine," said Helen E.
4-cm oval polyp exhibited invaginations on its surface.
A hypoxic environment during long-lasting hypoxia in sideropenic anemia can cause shape deformation of terminal villi, capillaries branch extensively and form fist-like terminal villi with short multiple invaginations that enlarge terminal villis' surface [29].
The primary diagnosis in 495 of the 615 samples examined was dysmorphic trophoblastic invaginations and inclusions.