inulin


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Related to inulin: inulin clearance

inulin

 [in´u-lin]
a starch occurring in the rhizome of certain plants, which on hydrolysis yields fructose. It is used as a measure of glomerular function in tests of renal function.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

in·u·lin (In),

(in'yū-lin),
A fructose polysaccharide from the rhizome of Inula helenium or elecampane (family Compositae) and other plants; administered intravenously, it is filtered by the renal glomeruli but not reabsorbed and thus can be used to determine the rate of glomerular filtration; also used in bread for diabetics. Compare: inulin clearance.
Synonym(s): alant starch, alantin, dahlin
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

inulin

(ĭn′yə-lĭn)
n.
A polysaccharide with the general formula C6nH10n+2O5n+1 that yields fructose when hydrolyzed and is found in the roots of many plants, especially those of the composite family. It is used as an additive in processed foods to replace fat or sugar and to increase fiber content.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

in·u·lin

(in'yū-lin)
A fructose polysaccharide from the rhizome of Inula and other plants; used by intravenous injection to determine the rate of glomerular filtration.
Compare: inulin clearance
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

inulin

a complex polymer of FRUCTOSE that is soluble in water and occurs in the cell sap of storage organs such as dahlia TUBERS and dandelion TAP ROOTS.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005

in·u·lin

(in'yū-lin)
Fructose polysaccharide administered intravenously to determine rate of glomerular filtration.
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
The DWG and weaning weight of lambs that received agave inulin or the combination of inulin with L.
We searched Web of Science (Science citation index expanded), PubMed (Medline), Embase and CENTRAL, Science direct, Google scholar, Scopus and Cochrane database to identify articles fulfilling our inclusion criteria using the following search terms: cancer OR neoplasm AND inulin OR supplement OR probiotics fiber OR prebiotic.
"Companies have been piggybacking on satiety claims for added fibers such as inulin for years," says Barbara Rolls, professor and the Helen A.
The researchers used three sources of soluble dietary fiber inulin: chicory, roasted chicory and artichoke at 15%, 20% and 25% replacement levels, along with 15% and 20% whey protein concentrate levels in a corn flour cereal base at lab- and pilot-scale extrusion conditions.
In group I (sham), only the abdominal cavity was opened, with dissection of the carotid, jugular, vesicostomy and introduction of Veress needle (without pneumoperitoneum), as well as collection of blood and urine as previously reported to measure the inulin clearance.
The use of inulin affected the moisture content; this is due to its water-holding capacity which increase the moisture content of the final product.
Bone densitometry was significantly increased (p < 0.05) by the administration of inulin from Mexican agave "Metlin" with isoflavones (0.243 g/[cm.sup.2]).
Kulich Pharma, Czech Republic) daily in the amount of 5ml per pig and the IG (n=6) received inulin (Beneo, Belgium) and horse chestnut (Aesculus Hippocastanum) (extract Hippocastani extractum siccum, Calendula, Slovak Republic) daily in the amounts of 4 and 1g per pig, respectively.
The freeze dried Bifidobacterium bifidum cells with fructooligosaccharide, xylo-oligosaccharide, isomaltooligosaccharide and inulin at the concentration of 4-20% (v/v) showed the viability of 20, 16, 12 and 4%, respectively (18).
The relevance of inulin for modern food industry is based on its ever increasing use as a fat and sugar replacer, as a texturizer especially in low fat dairy products (MEYER et al., 2007) and as a means to enhance the health characteristics of a food product therefore the properties as dietary fiber and prebiotic are important (TUNGLAND; MEYER, 2002).
In further tests, a total of 60 overweight volunteers took part in a 24-week study in which half were given IPE as a powder to add to their food and half given inulin.
Paul, MN, has patented a solid detergent composition comprising a first alkalinity source consisting essentially of at least one alkali metal silicate; at least one saccharide comprising sucrose, fructose, inulin, lactulose, maltose or combinations thereof or at least one sugar alcohol comprising sorbitol; at least one polycarboxylic acid polymer; water; optionally a secondary alkalinity source comprised of sodium carbonate; and a nonionic surfactant.