intuition

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intuition

 [in″too-ĭ´shun]
an awareness or knowing that seems to come unbidden and usually cannot be logically explained.

intuition

(ĭn″too-ĭsh′ĭn, tū-)
1. Assumed knowledge; guesswork; a hunch.
2. Nonrational cognition.

intuition

Knowledge apparently acquired without either observation or reasoning. The idea, although romantically attractive, wilts in the presence of modern psychological and physiological ideas. Few experts now believe that anything can come out of the brain that has not previously gone in, in however fragmentary a form. Intuition is probably the result of the synthesis of information from partly-conscious observations.
References in periodicals archive ?
Let us assume this testing view of intuitions, (4) and ask ourselves: which intuitions about fake barn cases must be accommodated by our theorizing?
De Brigard, Kolber, Sumner, Weijers, and Lazari-Radek and Singer argue that our intuitions about Nozick's experience machine are prone to some of the following misleading factors and biases:
Nondescriptivists in metaethics should say more about intuitions. For one popular theory has it that case-based intuitions are in the business of correctly categorizing or classifying (as not water, as not knowledge, as impermissible, and so on) merely by bringing to bear a semantic or conceptual competence.
Intuitions, in turn, are ways things appear, and moral intuitions are ways things appear in the moral domain.
For Popper, the problem of intuition was re-construed in terms of evolutionary cognition as the problem of "unconscious expectations" or "background knowledge".
Cooper: Forward Motion; Machala: Intuitions for Horn Quartet; Tschesbokoff/Machala: Elegy for Five Horns; Sondheim: Send in the Clowns; Koetsier, Cinq Nouvelles for Four Horns, Op.
It shows that describing the philosopher's data or sources does not require casting these as "intuitions".
with their moral intuitions; they might find a legal system more
Intuition is a difficult term to define; it is more difficult to develop an urge to define, since it has become a natural response with ones who have experienced it.
Just what intuition is or where it comes from remains a mystery.
Intuition is a complex phenomenon, and one that is often perceived as mystical and indefinable (Klein, 2003).
The roots of understanding intuition in nursing were identified initially by Carper (1978), who drew from the earlier works of Dewey (1958) and Polanyi (1964).