intuition


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intuition

 [in″too-ĭ´shun]
an awareness or knowing that seems to come unbidden and usually cannot be logically explained.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

intuition

(ĭn″too-ĭsh′ĭn, tū-)
1. Assumed knowledge; guesswork; a hunch.
2. Nonrational cognition.
Medical Dictionary, © 2009 Farlex and Partners

intuition

Knowledge apparently acquired without either observation or reasoning. The idea, although romantically attractive, wilts in the presence of modern psychological and physiological ideas. Few experts now believe that anything can come out of the brain that has not previously gone in, in however fragmentary a form. Intuition is probably the result of the synthesis of information from partly-conscious observations.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
There are many other ways we can open the channels of intuition and our inner knowing.
Strong scientific evidence to support intuition exists and various accounts of people's real life experiences add to its credibility.
Our confidence in intuition is derived from the hundreds of thousands of times over hundreds of thousands of years that we and our ancestors have instantaneously evaluated threats to our survival and successfully evaded them.
Intuition is a difficult term to define; it is more difficult to develop an urge to define, since it has become a natural response with ones who have experienced it.
It means you're listening to your intuition. It's amazing what we can do when we listen to our heart.
Great leadership intuition is a combination of natural ability (we are born with it) and instinct (we develop it).
Jay Liebowitz, distinguished chair of applied business and finance, wrote "How Well Do Executives Trust Their Intuition?" with several colleagues from New York to Poland.
Just as a fine line exists between genius and madness, an equally fine line exists between impulse (acting without thinking) and intuition (understanding without thinking or conscious reasoning).
What role does your intuition play in your decisions?
This makes the following explanation plausible: epistemologists reporting a no-achievement intuition have the more inclusive ability in mind; whereas epistemologists reporting an achievement intuition have the less inclusive ability in mind.
The book is a study of intuition as ancient philosophical schools conceived of it.