intubate


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intubate

 [in´too-bāt]
to perform intubation.

in·tu·bate

(in'tū-bāt),
To insert a tube.

intubate

(ĭn′to͞o-bāt′, -tyo͞o-)
tr.v. intu·bated, intu·bating, intu·bates
To insert a tube into (a hollow organ or body passage).

in′tu·ba′tion n.
in′tu·ba′tion·al adj.
in′tu·ba′tion·al·ly adv.

intubate

[in′tyo̅o̅bāt]
Etymology: L, in, within, tubus, tube
to catheterize or insert a tube into an organ or body part.

in·tu·bate

(in'tū-bāt)
To perform intubation.

in·tu·bate

(in'tū-bāt)
To insert a tube.

intubate (in´toobāt),

v to treat by intubation.

intubate

to perform intubation.
References in periodicals archive ?
Although the smallest camera available for the application is being used, it is still too large for the small tubes necessary to intubate infants and children.
The court heard he did not take steps to intubate and ventilate Tony - a procedure normally carried out by an anaesthetist.
That is, most anaesthetists had been in the situation of being unable to intubate or ventilate.
The residents were then asked to intubate the patients using the digital intubation method.
PATIENT'S CLAIM The ED physician should have remained with the patient until she was in the ICU; promethazine was contraindicated and led to cardiopulmonary arrest; the ED physician failed to intubate the patient in a timely manner.
Patients in the easy to intubate group had a Cormack Lehane score of I during direct laryngoscopy with or without manipulation of the larynx and easy tube insertion.
13) Training emergency doctors to intubate when indicated, rather than requesting an anaesthetist's assistance, is crucially time saving and therefore life saving.
Later, several attempts to intubate her in the emergency department were unsuccessful, necessitating continuous mask ventilation during a transfer by air ambulance to the Iowa Methodist Medical Center in Des Moines.
Interested in finding a better way to intubate patients with difficult airways, Dr.
With its video capabilities, the DCI system also offers remarkable image clarity with unobstructed lines of sight and magnification of the patient's anatomy, enabling anesthesiologists to more easily intubate around abnormalities and difficult pathologies.
In support of the company's therapy innovation strategy, Medtronic plc today announced it has acquired Aircraft Medical, a privately-held medical device company based in Edinburgh, Scotland, that develops affordable, handheld high-quality video laryngoscopes used by anesthesiologists and critical care professionals to intubate patients.