introvert

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introvert

 [in´tro-vert]
1. a person whose interest is turned inward to the self.
2. to turn one's interest inward to the self.
3. a structure that can be turned or drawn inwards.
4. to turn a part or organ inward upon itself.

in·tro·vert

(in'trō-vert),
1. One who tends to be unusually shy, introspective, self-centered, and avoids becoming concerned with or involved in the affairs of others. Compare: extrovert.
2. To turn a structure into itself, to invert.

introvert

/in·tro·vert/ (in´tro-vert)
1. a person whose interest is turned inward to the self.
2. to turn one's interest inward to the self.
3. a structure that can be turned or drawn inwards.
4. to turn a part or organ inward upon itself.

introvert

(ĭn′trə-vûrt′, ĭn′trə-vûrt′)
tr.v. intro·verted, intro·verting, intro·verts
1. To turn or direct inward.
2. Psychology To concentrate (one's interests) upon oneself.
3. Medicine To turn (a tubular organ or part) inward upon itself.
n. (ĭn′trə-vûrt′)
1. Psychology An introverted person.
2. Medicine An anatomical structure that is capable of being introverted.

introvert

[in′trəvurt]
Etymology: L, intro + vertere, to turn
1 n, a person whose interests are directed inward and who is shy, withdrawn, emotionally reserved, and self-absorbed.
2 v, to turn inward or to direct one's interests and thoughts toward oneself. Compare ambivert, extrovert. See also egocentric.

introvert

Psychiatry A person who is introspective, self-conscious, often meticulous, a poor social mixer, who takes criticism too seriously. Cf Extrovert.

in·tro·vert

(intrō-vĕrt)
1. One who tends to be unusually shy, introspective, self-centered, and avoids becoming concerned with or involved in the affairs of others.
Compare: extrovert
2. To turn a structure into itself.

introvert

A person whose tendency of mind is to look inwards, to contemplate his or her own thoughts, feelings and emotions rather than to seek social intercourse. The introvert is often OBSESSIVE, anxious, HYPOCHONDRIACAL and solitary, more concerned with thought than with action. Compare EXTROVERT.
References in periodicals archive ?
Introverts also fall asleep when they want to stay awake more often than extroverts.
A new study shows that introverts and extroverts show activity in different brain structures, which mirror the wildly opposing aspects of their personalities.
Probably the most demanding stage of introverts is adulthood, when they find themselves in an environment of never-ending competition - for example, for promotions, rewards, power, and more in the workplace.
In the 1960s the psychologist Hans Eysenck found out about a major differentiatior between introverts and extraverts, that being the high stimulation extraverts need from the world in order to feel energetic, whereas introverts are much more easily inward stimulated and therefore more inclined into loneliness and quietness.
We just looked at each other and knew we should do it," said Granneman, who created the online publication Introvert, Dear.
Introverts can be very successful at all sorts of things because they give themselves time to think and figure out what to do.
Asking introverts too many questions makes them withdraw more.
Yet, because introverts tend to be modest, they may struggle with some aspects of leadership, such as advocating for their ideas.
Regardless of your profession, aspirations or age, any introvert will find valuable counsel and guidance in this brainy, accessible book.
Increase work in pairs, which are beneficial for both introverts and extroverts.
With the help of technology and some clever framing, introverts get to do what they want (which is usually to recharge from the always-around-people workweek) without looking like losers (as how society would judge).