introversion

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Related to introvertive: ambivert

introversion

 [in″tro-ver´zhun]
1. the turning outside in, more or less completely, of an organ, or the resulting condition.
2. preoccupation with oneself, with reduction of interest in the outside world.

in·tro·ver·sion

(in'trō-ver'zhŭn),
1. The turning of a structure into itself.
See also: intussusception, invagination.
2. A trait of preoccupation with oneself, as practiced by an introvert. Compare: extraversion.
[intro- + L. verto, pp. versus, to turn]

introversion

(ĭn′trə-vûr′zhən)
n.
1. The act or process of introverting or the condition of being introverted.
2. Psychology The direction of or tendency to direct one's thoughts and feelings toward oneself.

in′tro·ver′sive (-vûr′sĭv) adj.

in·tro·ver·sion

(in'trō-vĕr'zhŭn)
1. The turning of a structure into itself.
See also: intussusception, invagination
2. A trait of preoccupation with oneself, as practiced by an introvert.
Compare: extraversion
[intro- + L. verto, pp. versus, to turn]

introversion

1. A physical turning in upon itself, as may occur with a hollow organ.
2. A directing of psychic energy in upon the self. See also INTROVERT.

in·tro·ver·sion

(in'trō-vĕr'zhŭn)
The turning of a structure into itself.
See also: invagination
[intro- + L. verto, pp. versus, to turn]
References in periodicals archive ?
Negative linkages with Introvertive Mysticism, Interpretation of Mysticism, and Integrative Self-Knowledge pointed toward an Extrinsic Social incompatibility with both religious and psychological openness.
McCreery and Claridge (2002) found that out-of-body experients had higher scores than nonexperients on the aberrant perceptions and beliefs factor of the Combined Schizotypal Traits Questionnaire, but did not differ significantly on the introvertive anhedonia, asocial schizotypy, or cognitive disorganization factors.
In subjects with low scores on the O-LIFE Cognitive Disorganization scale, high scores on the Unusual Experiences scale were associated with more positive or pleasant subjective evaluations of paranormal experiences, whereas among subjects with high levels of cognitive disorganization, higher levels of introvertive anhedonia were significantly associated with more negative subjective evaluations of paranormal experiences (Schofield & Claridge, 2007).
Studies examining the structure of schizotypy have consistently identified three underlying factors: aberrant perceptions and beliefs in other worlds (the positive symptoms of psychosis, i.e., hallucinations and delusions) ; cognitive failures (thought blocking and attentional difficulties) together with social anxiety; and introvertive anhedonia (inability to experience pleasure and social withdrawal; Goulding, 2004).
Factor analysis of these traits reliably produces four factors, one of which (unusual experiences) contains items consonant with the positive symptoms of psychotic illness (i.e., hallucinations, delusions, and thought disorder), together with cognitive disorganisation, introvertive anhedonia, and impulsive nonconformity.
Apparent encounters with a transcendent reality can range from mild to extreme, and from introvertive (the object of the experience being beyond time, space, and form) to extravertive (the encounter does not cancel out the perception of ordinary objects but rather suffuses them).