introjection

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introjection

 [in″tro-jek´shun]
an unconscious defense mechanism considered immature, in which loved or hated external objects are absorbed into the self as a means of diminishing anxiety by reducing the fear of loss (in the case of a loved object) or by internalizing the aggressive characteristic and putting it under control (in the case of a hated object).
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

in·tro·jec·tion

(in'trō-jek'shŭn),
A psychological defense mechanism involving appropriation of an external happening and its assimilation by the personality, making it a part of the self.
[intro- + L. jacto, to throw]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

introjection

(ĭn′trə-jĕk′shən)
n.
An unconscious defense mechanism in which one incorporates characteristics of another person or object into one's own psyche.

in′tro·ject′ v.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

in·tro·jec·tion

(in'trō-jek'shŭn)
A psychological defense mechanism involving appropriation of an external happening and its assimilation by the personality, making it a part of the self.
[intro- + L. jacto, to throw]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012
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Hinshelwood describes this as "the essentially dynamic mode by which the individual attains membership of a group on the basis of projective and introjective identifications" (289).
[Family dynamics in transgenerational traumatisation: Narcissistic ("introjective") and projective identification as a parental defense mechanism] Zeitschrift fur psychoanalytische Theorie und Praxis (Journal for Psychoanalytical Theory and Practice), 12, 425-448.
For her, melancholia is "the aborted introjective movement brought about by an excess of sadism in the oral cannibalistic stage" (119), a different account with different consequences than Freud's, which has the melancholic ego "impoverished and megalomaniac." One of Sanchez-Pardo's great strengths is her ability, vocal blends aside, to elucidate these and other topics clearly and in great detail.
In opting for an introjective rather than a purely intertextual model of literary transference, Conde's fiction downplays the ethics of reversal in favor of a preoccupation with the transmission of literary voice.
In this regard, the work of Nicolas Abraham and Maria Torok on the problem of melancholy seems particularly pertinent, since they trace the "introjective" process through which the work of mourning takes place precisely back to a first inscription of lack related to the mother--to the way in which infants learn to mediate the loss of the maternal object in feeding through the use of the voice and speech, gradually bringing the loss to words or symbolic representation.
such an expression cannot fulfill the introjective function--make an
We also consider relevant anamorphic motifs in reproductions of Velazquez's Las Meninas, Hohlbein's The Ambassadors, and several of Magritte's paintings, especially Le Faux Miroir ("The False Mirror") with its Lacanian implications for the introjective and projective (rather than simply reflective) obsessions of the Gothic gaze.
In order for the introjective metaphor to be taken literally, the limit prohibiting introjection has to be situated in the mouth - as the very paradigm of introjection.
Fichman, Koestner, and Zuroff describe two types of depression: anaclitic, which includes feelings of helplessness, fears of being abandoned, and wanting to be cared for and loved; and introjective, which includes intense feelings of inferiority, guilt, worthlessness, and a sense of not living up to abstract standards.
The baby/mother interaction leads by processes of projective and introjective identification to the creation of an inner world in the baby, based on its experience of being "contained" by the mother.
And it--this reading--will have to confront, perhaps above and beyond all else, the effects of such meaningful-moral collapse on the novel's treatment of gender and sexuality, by which the female object-to-be-mastered flows ceaselessly into the subject to-be-loved, and any attempt to spit out the bad is blocked by the introjective projection of "self" in the mode of a muculent hole.