introjection

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introjection

 [in″tro-jek´shun]
an unconscious defense mechanism considered immature, in which loved or hated external objects are absorbed into the self as a means of diminishing anxiety by reducing the fear of loss (in the case of a loved object) or by internalizing the aggressive characteristic and putting it under control (in the case of a hated object).
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

in·tro·jec·tion

(in'trō-jek'shŭn),
A psychological defense mechanism involving appropriation of an external happening and its assimilation by the personality, making it a part of the self.
[intro- + L. jacto, to throw]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

introjection

(ĭn′trə-jĕk′shən)
n.
An unconscious defense mechanism in which one incorporates characteristics of another person or object into one's own psyche.

in′tro·ject′ v.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

in·tro·jec·tion

(in'trō-jek'shŭn)
A psychological defense mechanism involving appropriation of an external happening and its assimilation by the personality, making it a part of the self.
[intro- + L. jacto, to throw]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012
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Following a sequence of projection and introjection, Klein (1932) considered the obsessional neurotic to typically reproject the fear of being attacked or destroyed by introjected objects while attempting to 'control' (p.
The fantasized intimacy of death has replaced failed collectivities: whatever psychological satisfactions and benefits Giorgio might have found in Croce's destroyed collectivities he must find among his introjections and his jumbled selves.
Let's return to the initial months of life to review the onset of projection and introjections. Melanie Klein (1975) observed two primary kinds of introjection: loving and ruthless.
This capacity for utilizing meaningful perceptions cross-modally underlies our human capacity to create fully abstract internalized object relationship (identifications) out of perceptually based introjections.
Loretta's introjection of the debris of the tuner city is evident in her juxtaposition of sentences: "I don't really look like this, I look a different way.
Rather, what is overpowered and what imprints on "the fourth look" is an 'afterimage,' as in the psychical mechanism of introjection.
identified--because it is genuinely figural--with introjection by
The place of Rufus and his suicide in the psychology of the characters (and in the text itself) brings to mind Nicolas Abraham and Maria Torok's notion of the crypt, which builds upon their work on introjection and incorporation.
The way to do this, I think, is by a detailed examination of the particular types of phantasy--projective identification, introjection, splitting--that Kleinians have isolated as central to the human mind's primordial activities.(7)
Meanwhile, Edwina returns to Agustin in a photograph which he chews up and swallows, desperate in his desire for empowerment and identification by introjection into his other, or she returns to him in totally fragmented images.
(17.) The French: "Elle [la voix maternelle] porte, en effet, les premieres introjections preparatoires aux identifications." (18.) Citations from Reich's music will be in minutes and seconds read from a compact-disc player.
This person did not complete the introjection of a healthy nurturing caregiver, or the healthy introjections were outweighed by unhealthy introjections.