introjection

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introjection

 [in″tro-jek´shun]
an unconscious defense mechanism considered immature, in which loved or hated external objects are absorbed into the self as a means of diminishing anxiety by reducing the fear of loss (in the case of a loved object) or by internalizing the aggressive characteristic and putting it under control (in the case of a hated object).

in·tro·jec·tion

(in'trō-jek'shŭn),
A psychological defense mechanism involving appropriation of an external happening and its assimilation by the personality, making it a part of the self.
[intro- + L. jacto, to throw]

introjection

/in·tro·jec·tion/ (in″trah-jek´shun) a mental mechanism in which the standards and values of other persons or groups are unconsciously and symbolically taken within oneself.

introjection

(ĭn′trə-jĕk′shən)
n.
An unconscious defense mechanism in which one incorporates characteristics of another person or object into one's own psyche.

in′tro·ject′ v.

introjection

[-jek′shən]
Etymology: L, intro + jacere, to throw
an ego defense mechanism whereby an individual unconsciously incorporates into his own ego structure the qualities of another person, usually a significant other. It happens early in life and continues less intensely throughout.

in·tro·jec·tion

(in'trō-jek'shŭn)
A psychological defense mechanism involving appropriation of an external happening and its assimilation by the personality, making it a part of the self.
[intro- + L. jacto, to throw]
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References in periodicals archive ?
In short, the excessive projection of and identification with sadistic parts of the self were viewed as necessitating the control and restoration of external objects, while the disproportionate introjection of and identification with destructive objects required the control and restoration of parts of the self.
The severity of obsessional neurosis was considered to depend on the degree of the preceding paranoid disturbance, the less than successful introjection, projection and reintrojection of good objects, and the failure of the obsessional mechanisms to reduce persecutory anxieties (Klein, 1932).
Such perpetual introjection is actually a travesty of Scripture: Ippolita describes herself in the encomiastic language of conversion to Christ.
Mourning is determining: Giorgio's relentless self-concern arises from his mother's introjection of him.
Let's return to the initial months of life to review the onset of projection and introjections.
This capacity for utilizing meaningful perceptions cross-modally underlies our human capacity to create fully abstract internalized object relationship (identifications) out of perceptually based introjections.
In introjection, "representations are taken into the self, and provide the basis for a momentary subjectivity [emphasis mine]--a spectator's previous structuration" (23).
The experience of the adult relating to the inner child reinforced Catherine's adult ego strength, bringing full circle her introjection of a positive model of mature nurturing.
Searles (1965) notes that besides the centrality of projection in the mental life of the schizophrenic patient, introjection is also important:
identified--because it is genuinely figural--with introjection by
The place of Rufus and his suicide in the psychology of the characters (and in the text itself) brings to mind Nicolas Abraham and Maria Torok's notion of the crypt, which builds upon their work on introjection and incorporation.
Its focus has shifted from the past and individual issues concerning patriarchal power, repression, resistance, knowledge, sex and castration, to the present and interpersonal issues concerning maternal care and its vicissitudes--identification, idealization and envy, deprivation and loss, love and hate, introjection and projection.