introjection


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

introjection

 [in″tro-jek´shun]
an unconscious defense mechanism considered immature, in which loved or hated external objects are absorbed into the self as a means of diminishing anxiety by reducing the fear of loss (in the case of a loved object) or by internalizing the aggressive characteristic and putting it under control (in the case of a hated object).
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

in·tro·jec·tion

(in'trō-jek'shŭn),
A psychological defense mechanism involving appropriation of an external happening and its assimilation by the personality, making it a part of the self.
[intro- + L. jacto, to throw]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

introjection

(ĭn′trə-jĕk′shən)
n.
An unconscious defense mechanism in which one incorporates characteristics of another person or object into one's own psyche.

in′tro·ject′ v.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

in·tro·jec·tion

(in'trō-jek'shŭn)
A psychological defense mechanism involving appropriation of an external happening and its assimilation by the personality, making it a part of the self.
[intro- + L. jacto, to throw]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
Increased psychological stress: Some participants applied silence and introjection strategies against questions raised by others, stigma, and husband's mental as well as physical violence.
It is joined by identified motivation, which is relatively autonomous, as these two forms of autonomous extrinsic motivation are distinct from both introjection, which is more controlled than self-determined, and external regulation, which is fully controlled.
In the motivation portion of the questionnaire, contrary to the researchers' expectations, the Chinese children did not score lower than their Caucasian counterparts on introjection. Although much of the current research on cultural norms indicates Asian parents use less praise and more "shaming" as motivational and disciplinary techniques, (5) this apparently did not lead to high scoring responses in this area.
Finally, 196 of the subjects also completed the Christian Religious Internalization Scale (CRIS; Ryan et al., 1993) which has two subscales: introjection and identification.
In Freud's tripartite dissection of the psyche, the superego represents the introjection of the punishing Father and the norms of society, an internalization that is charged with the power of the id, and like the id, is insulated from the external world.
The 21st century economics and history have determined abjection in the New World; economic collapse has become conducive to a fatal prevention of the usual introjection Kristeva talks about; therefore we have abomination and, in the end the unleashing of the "persecutive powers" in Auster's text--the fist punching the officer and the police forcefully evicting the squatters.
The hallucinatory logic that undergirds human relations to gauna, then, shades quickly from projection to introjection, particularly in the sense Maria Torok retrieves from the writings of Sandor Ferenczi.
This is where Ferenczi's theory of introjection becomes helpful.
Introjection refers to behaviors that are regulated by internal pressures such as guilt or anxiety.