introjection

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introjection

 [in″tro-jek´shun]
an unconscious defense mechanism considered immature, in which loved or hated external objects are absorbed into the self as a means of diminishing anxiety by reducing the fear of loss (in the case of a loved object) or by internalizing the aggressive characteristic and putting it under control (in the case of a hated object).
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

in·tro·jec·tion

(in'trō-jek'shŭn),
A psychological defense mechanism involving appropriation of an external happening and its assimilation by the personality, making it a part of the self.
[intro- + L. jacto, to throw]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

introjection

(ĭn′trə-jĕk′shən)
n.
An unconscious defense mechanism in which one incorporates characteristics of another person or object into one's own psyche.

in′tro·ject′ v.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

in·tro·jec·tion

(in'trō-jek'shŭn)
A psychological defense mechanism involving appropriation of an external happening and its assimilation by the personality, making it a part of the self.
[intro- + L. jacto, to throw]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012
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Indeed, for Lacan, these losses begin with birth, what he terms the "specific prematurity of birth in man" (Lacan, Ecrits 4), a lack for which the child attempts to compensate by introjecting into itself prior to the mirror stage those objects which it sees as extensions of itself, as the privileged objects that will complete it.
The arrangement of the topics in Pepper's book eventually funnels the reader toward the conclusion (perhaps the only forthright contention contained within) that literary criticism functions in an "attempt to understand a literary text, a singularity, a real, a chance and unique event, by introjecting it into a story of which it would be a part" (165) and, ultimately, that theories "do not enable a knowledge of any text other than themselves" (171).
This interpretation diminishes the explanatory importance of the subject's introjecting the object of his fear.
He tentatively suggests that Camus, 'in classic psychoanalytical terms, is introjecting Dostoevsky's world in order to exorcise it, once and for all, from his preoccupations' (p.