introjection

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introjection

 [in″tro-jek´shun]
an unconscious defense mechanism considered immature, in which loved or hated external objects are absorbed into the self as a means of diminishing anxiety by reducing the fear of loss (in the case of a loved object) or by internalizing the aggressive characteristic and putting it under control (in the case of a hated object).
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

in·tro·jec·tion

(in'trō-jek'shŭn),
A psychological defense mechanism involving appropriation of an external happening and its assimilation by the personality, making it a part of the self.
[intro- + L. jacto, to throw]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

introjection

(ĭn′trə-jĕk′shən)
n.
An unconscious defense mechanism in which one incorporates characteristics of another person or object into one's own psyche.

in′tro·ject′ v.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

in·tro·jec·tion

(in'trō-jek'shŭn)
A psychological defense mechanism involving appropriation of an external happening and its assimilation by the personality, making it a part of the self.
[intro- + L. jacto, to throw]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012
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The scale uses the following stem: "I take part in PE..." and comprises 19 items which measure students amotivation (4 items; e.g., "But I really don't know why"), external regulation (3 items; e.g., "So that the teacher won't yell at me"), introjected regulation (4 items; e.g., "Because it would bother me if I didn't"), identified regulation (4 items; e.g., "Because it is important to me to try in PE") and intrinsic regulation (4 items; e.g., "Because PE is fun").
Differences were found in introjected regulation and years climbing F(2, 89) = 6.72, p = .002, [eta]2 = .013.
It is based on self-reported reasons for engaging in school-related behaviors and contains four subscales that reflect the SDT continuum from extrinsically motivated to intrinsically motivated behaviors and the four corresponding regulatory styles: three forms of extrinsic motivation (external, introjected, and identified regulation) as well as intrinsic motivation (intrinsic regulation).
The questionnaire is composed of five factors (four items for each factor): intrinsic motivation (e.g., "because PE is fun"), regulation identified (e.g., "because it is important for me to do well in PE"), introjected regulation (e.g., "because I feel bad about myself if I did not"), external regulation (e.g., "because I will have problems if I do not") and amotivation (e.g., "but I really don't know why").
Post hoc pairwise comparison analysis showed that obese-III participants had significantly higher scores on external regulation (p <0.05), introjected regulation (p <0.001) and identified regulation (p <0.05) compared to their underweight peers.
Other authors [34] have also supported the positive relationship between work engagement and intrinsic regulation as well as between work engagement and identified regulation, and introjected regulation.
Each activity has four items that correspond to the CDMAS subscales Intrinsic Motivation, Identified Regulation, Introjected Regulation, and External Regulation.
Internal reliability analyses of the CRIS produced Cronbach Alphas of .81 and .93 for introjected and identified regulation, respectively.
Three subscales measure extrinsic motivation: Extrinsic Motivation External Regulation (EMER), Extrinsic Motivation Introjected Regulation (EMIN), and Extrinsic Motivation Identified Regulation (EMID).
Extrinsic motivation can be divided into four particular regulations that diversify in their level of self-determination: external, introjected, identified and integrated.