introjection

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introjection

 [in″tro-jek´shun]
an unconscious defense mechanism considered immature, in which loved or hated external objects are absorbed into the self as a means of diminishing anxiety by reducing the fear of loss (in the case of a loved object) or by internalizing the aggressive characteristic and putting it under control (in the case of a hated object).

in·tro·jec·tion

(in'trō-jek'shŭn),
A psychological defense mechanism involving appropriation of an external happening and its assimilation by the personality, making it a part of the self.
[intro- + L. jacto, to throw]

introjection

/in·tro·jec·tion/ (in″trah-jek´shun) a mental mechanism in which the standards and values of other persons or groups are unconsciously and symbolically taken within oneself.

introjection

(ĭn′trə-jĕk′shən)
n.
An unconscious defense mechanism in which one incorporates characteristics of another person or object into one's own psyche.

in′tro·ject′ v.

introjection

[-jek′shən]
Etymology: L, intro + jacere, to throw
an ego defense mechanism whereby an individual unconsciously incorporates into his own ego structure the qualities of another person, usually a significant other. It happens early in life and continues less intensely throughout.

in·tro·jec·tion

(in'trō-jek'shŭn)
A psychological defense mechanism involving appropriation of an external happening and its assimilation by the personality, making it a part of the self.
[intro- + L. jacto, to throw]
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References in periodicals archive ?
In terms of motivational regulations for physical education classes, the highest score observed was for identified regulation, followed by intrinsic motivation, introjected regulation, and external regulation, with the lowest result recorded for demotivation.
The variables that contributed the most to discrimination among the groups were introjected regulation, F(2, 369) = 273.
Introjected regulation: There was no significant group effect, F (1,124) = 0.
The 19-item Behavioural Regulations in Exercise Questionnaire-2 (BREQ-2) is contained five subscales that measure varying degrees of exercise regulations, namely external (I take part in exercise because my family/friends/partner say I should), introjected (I feel guilty when I don't exercise), identified (It's important to me to exercise regularly), intrinsic (I exercise because it is fun) regulations and amotivation (I think exercising is a waste of time) (Markland & Tobin, 2004).
He asserts that abnormal narcissism, which he calls secondary, organizes human personhood in a context where love turns inward with aggressivity that, like libido, is introjected (see Kernberg, 1975, p.
introjected regulation and external regulation) require increasingly more extrinsic motivation to compensate for the child's lack of either interest in the task (intrinsic motivation) or belief that the activity, behavior, or task is instrumentally important to their goals or identity (autonomous extrinsic motivation).
The dimension representing autonomous motivation in the scale is made up of statements which express the levels of extrinsic motivation by identified and integrated regulation and, further, intrinsic motivation, as the dimension of controlled motivation raises questions which deal with extrinsic motivation by external and introjected regulation.
Deci and Ryan (2008) distinguish four types of extrinsic motivation regulation with increasing amounts of self-determined behavior: external, introjected, identified, and integrated regulation.
Three types of extrinsic motivation have been researched: identified regulation, introjected regulation and external regulation (Goudas, Biddle, & Fox, 1994).
But in Eggerer's paintings, Warhol's procedure has been introjected within the figure: Here the body is internally divided, partitioned, into distinct temporal zones.
When students follow a teacher's rules or do their homework in order to avoid guilt or embarrassment they are involved in introjected regulation.
What this means is that, as a result of these projected and introjected predicaments, a given psychopathology will be passed on to the next generation: as Winnicott says, 'the child may grow to be just like mother, nurse, aunt, brother, or whoever at the time dominates the scene'.