introject


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in·tro·ject

(in'trō-jekt),
The dynamically endowed, enduring internal representation of an object.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

in·tro·ject

(in'trō-jekt')
The dynamically endowed, enduring internal representation of an object.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
Rina's testimony revealed how her fathers' suffering and the circumstances of his death continued to haunt and distress her: 'My uncle told me that my father was beaten so badly at Buchenwald camp, that he could not work, he stopped eating and got weaker and weaker, and then he died in the mud!' During this account Rina wept for the loss of her father and the loss of his dignity, as well as for her own internal loss of a protective, parental introject. She carried terrible pain knowing that her protector had died in such a defeated way.
This anxiety renders subjects passive in the face of violence and insecurity: in the name of securing the subject, resilience introjects violence into the structure of subjectivity.
The act of rising above the fear and expressing feelings to the introject is empowering, and proves to the Vaded state that there is nothing to fear.
The only way in which she could struggle against this problematic identification was by following Freud's advice--that of hating the introjected object into valuelessness and then abandoning it.
In this existential horizon no spirit is an introject or an intrapsychic object or a un/conscious image.
If the style is introjected, obsessiveness results, and according to Shapiro (1965), there will be a loss of affective mobility and range and the person will find themselves unable to let go of an anticipation of what "should" be done.
Klein follows Freud in this respect when she writes in "A Contribution to the Psychogenesis of Manic-Depressive States," "In this stage the ego is more than ever driven both by love and by need to introject the object" (C 284).
It appeared that she had never formed, or had been unable to retain, a stable introject of the protecting mother, essential to developing a secure and separate self.
Resurrecting the good parent entails masculinizing the indifferent mother as a caring paternal introject patterned on the Jesuit educators and sullying the real object of des Esseintes' hatred through acts designed to shock.
This is not the case, however, with "The Oval Portrait," for one of the central problems in this story is that it is impossible to abolish or to introject the original in its entirety.
There are two forms of controlled motivation: external regulation, where activities are performed for external prompts or factors (e.g., to gain rewards or to get a good grade), and introjected regulation, where activities are performed through internal pressure or self-set contingencies (e.g., feeling of guilt).
Reading through the opposing person's text-based message may be felt like a voice inside one's head, as if the other individual's inner, psychological self and their self's effect on the other, have been integrated or introjected into one's consciousness.