intravasation


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intravasation

 [in-trav″ah-za´shun]
the entrance of foreign material into vessels.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

intravasation

(ĭn-trăv′ə-sā′shən)
n.
Entry of foreign matter into a blood vessel.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
Lin et al., "Direct visualization of macrophage-assisted tumor cell intravasation in mammary tumors," Cancer Research, vol.
Although extracellular matrix degradation has been considered as the main MMPs mechanism of involvement in tumor invasion, followed by intravasation into circulation, extravasation, and migration to metastatic sites [76].
Reaming of the medullary canal has been shown to increase intramedullary pressure and causes intravasation of bone marrow and fat into the venous blood system.
The AAGL's Practice Guidelines for the Management of Hysteroscopic Distending Media lists an intravasation safety limit of 2,500 cc for isotonic solution, compared with a maximum limit of 1,000 cc when using hypotonic solutions (J.
SERPINB1 (serine protease inhibitor, clade B, member 1) has been shown to be downregulated in hepatocellular carcinoma and is correlatively related with cancer metastasis and intravasation [46].
Metastasis involves five steps, including local invasion and migration through extracellular matrix and surrounding stromal cells, intravasation to blood capillaries, survival in circulation, extravasation, colonization, and proliferation in the distal tissue [1].
Metastases of lung cancer cells to bone are achieved through a complex cascade of events which can be broadly depicted as follows [6,17]: (a) tumor cell detachment from the primary site and invasion through the basement membrane and stroma, (b) intravasation into lymphatic system or blood vessels, (c) survival of tumor cells within the circulation and plantation at distant sites, (d) tumor cells extravasation into distant tissue microenvironment, (e) existence of tumor cells in the distant tumor stroma, and (f) proliferation to micrometastases and formation of tumor at bone metastatic sites.
Once tumor cells acquire abilities of intravasation and survival in an unfavorable vascular environment, they circulate around the whole body parts to form new tumors at the secondary site [147].
[20] emphasizes the high diagnostic specificity related to the combination of gastrointestinal blood loss and the reported CT signs of AEF (periaortic fluid/soft tissue, breach of the aortic wall, pseudoaneurysm formation, loss of fat pad between aorta and intestine, ectopic gas, and intravasation of contrast material into the intestinal lumen).
Cancer metastasis involves a series of steps including angiogenesis, detachment of tumor cells from the primary tumor, intravasation, evasion of host defense, arrest and attachment at a distant site, extravasation, dormant survival, and establishment of new growth.
Unfortunately, although all disseminating tumor types employ largely similar mechanisms in the multistage process of local tissue invasion, intravasation, survival in the circulation, extravasation, and colonization of distant organs, their disseminating activities differ considerably in frequency, direction, and temporal course.
Intravasation of contrast agent during hysterosalpingography is a rare event.
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