birth weight

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Related to intrauterine growth restriction: intrauterine growth retardation

birth weight

in humans, the first weight of an infant obtained within less than the first 60 completed minutes after birth; a full-size infant is one weighing 2500 g or more; a low birth weight is less than 2500 g.; very low birth weight is less than 1500 g.; and extremely low birth weight is less than 1000 g.

birth weight

or

birthweight

(bûrth′wāt′)
n.
The weight of an infant at birth.

birth weight

The weight of a newborn child which, in the US, averages 3.2 kg at 37-week/term

birth weight

The weight of a newborn child which, in the US, averages 3.2 kg at 37-wk/term. See Low-birth weight, Very low-birth weight.

birth weight

(bĭrth wāt)
In humans, the first weight of an infant obtained within less than the first 60 completed minutes after birth; a full-size infant weighs 2500 g or more; low birth weight is less than 2500 g.

birth weight

(bĭrth wāt)
In humans, the first weight of an infant obtained within less than the first 60 completed minutes after birth; a full-size infant is one weighing 2500 g or more; a low birth weight is less than 2500 g.; very low birth weight is less than 1500 g.; and extremely low birth weight is less than 1000 g.

Patient discussion about birth weight

Q. what is the normal weight of a baby? what does it say if one weights less or more than the normal ?

A. Here is a site I use very often, and this is the page concerning infants' growth and development. Because it's a statistical measure changing from different ages and races, you might find an answer there. It's all videos of pediatricians lectures:
http://www.drmdk.com/html/growth_and_development.html


Q. what is the right weight for a baby who just has been norn to weight ?

A. The average weight for a newborn is 2.5 - 4 kilos. A baby that weighs less than 2.5 kilos is considered 'small for gestational age' and a baby that is born over 4 kilos is considererd 'large for gestational age'.

Q. How to loss weight like a diet with tea,pills or other kind of healthy thing.

A. drink 8 oz of warm water with 1 tablespoon of lemon... first thing in the morning

More discussions about birth weight
References in periodicals archive ?
Umbilical artery Doppler flow velocimetry in intrauterine growth restriction and its relation to perinatal outcome.
Wolter et al., "Mass spectrometric profiling of cord blood serum proteomes to distinguish infants with intrauterine growth restriction from those who are small for gestational age and from control individuals," Translational Research, vol.
Tables 2 and 3 show data for hormonal and metabolic parameters at birth and at 8 years of age for the children included classified as intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) and normal birth weight (NBW).
Relationship between abnormal fetal testing and adverse perinatal outcomes in intrauterine growth restriction. Am J Obstet Gynecol 2007; 196: e48-51.
Among the women in the sample, 824 experienced one of the adverse pregnancy outcomes studied: 126 antepartum hemorrhage, 233 preterm labor, 308 preterm delivery, 134 intrauterine growth restriction and 23 perinatal death.
Babies were more likely to be small for gestational age, have intrauterine growth restriction (OR, 2.16; 95% CI, 1.34-3.48; NNTH, 21), and be delivered preterm (OR, 1.35; 95% CI, 1.02-1.79; NNTH, 35).
Small for gestational age and intrauterine growth restriction decreases cognitive function in young adults.
A combination of environmental, genetic, and epigenetic factors, still partially unknown, can be responsible for a condition in which a fetus is unable to reach its genetically determined growth potential: this condition is defined as intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) [1,2].
Background: Pregnant women, infants, and children are adversely affected by disasters resulting in an increased number of infants with intrauterine growth restriction, low birth weight, and a small head circumference.
Her pregnancy was therefore at high risk for developing intrauterine growth restriction. Her US Navy ObGyn was advised by a maternal-fetal medicine (MFM) specialist to monitor the pregnancy closely with frequent ultrasonography and other tests that were never performed.
These charts have traditionally been used in Norway to define neonatal SGA and intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) (Figures 2 and 3).
Coverage also includes underweight and obese women, anemia, infections, abnormalities, medical diseases, hypertensive disorders, normal and abnormal labor, intrapartum monitoring and management, induction of labor, twins and multiple pregnancy, intrauterine growth restriction, instrumental delivery, postpartum collapse and hemorrhage, trauma, maternal injuries, cesarean delivery, neonatal resuscitation, prematurity, postmaturity, ultrasonography, diet and exercise, prescribing in pregnancy, and other issues.

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